^ Back to Top
954-260-0805

parentteenrolemodelYou are your teen’s most important role model. 75 percent of American children say family members are among their top role models, compared to 25 percent who identify their role models as celebrities or athletes, according to a survey by the Horatio Alger Association. This makes the example you set crucial to your teen’s development. Here are some ways your example can influence your teenager and ways you can make sure you’re setting the example you want your teen to follow.

Diet

When it comes to diet, what you eat directly impacts your teen’s health. Unfortunately, in many cases, teens are learning unhealthy eating habits. One-third of American children and adolescents are overweight or obese, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, citing the Journal of the American Medical Association.

The Health and Agriculture Departments’ Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends that all persons aged two and older should maintain a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains and low-fat and fat-free dairy products. Additionally, both parents and teens should consume less than 10 percent of their daily calorie intake from added sugars, less than 10 percent from saturated fat and less than 2,300 milligrams of sodium per day. Serving and eating the right food at your meals will help your teen develop healthy eating habits of their own.

Exercise

The government’s dietary guidelines are meant to work in coordination with the Department of Health and Human Services’ Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans. Only one in four U.S. teens gets enough exercise, according to the Centers for Disease Control.

Parents who model good exercise habits and encourage their teens to be physically active can help promote health in teens. Adults need at least 150 minutes of moderately-intense physical activity or 75 minutes of intense activity each week, including strengthening exercises two or more days a week. Youth between the ages of 6 and 17 need at least 60 minutes of activity each day, which should include muscle-strengthening, bone-strengthening and aerobic activities. Engaging in family activities and sports that involve physical activity can help motivate you and your teen to follow these guidelines.

Education

Your teen’s education begins at home. Children of parents who have low literacy levels have a 72 percent chance of finding themselves at the lowest reading levels, making them more likely to get poor grades and drop out, according to the National Bureau of Economic Research.

Education writer Varda Epstein recommends taking some proactive steps to get your teen to read. Model good reading habits by giving your teen a copy of your favorite book from when you were their age. Buy them a book related to their own interests; leave interesting reading material in the bathroom or other places in the house where they are likely to see it; give them a gift card for a bookstore; or perhaps declare a No-Tech Day to get your teen off the smartphone.

Career Development

Your behavior can also help influence your teen’s career development in a positive direction. Modeling and encouraging an entrepreneurial spirit can set your teen on a path toward career advancement or even owning their own business.

Acceleration Partners founder Bob Glazer suggests using simple activities such as mowing lawns to teach your teen basic business skills. You can have your teen do such activities to increase their allowance or earn money from neighbors. Encourage them to follow their own ideas to think of other ways to earn money. Get them involved with organizations such as Junior Achievement. Get yourself involved with an organization such as Amway where you can explore entrepreneurial and intrapreneurial activities and get your teen involved in what you’re doing. You can also try opening a savings account for your teen to teach them how to save what they earn.

Online Behavior

The average teen spends nine hours a day online consuming media such as videos and music, according to a study by family technology education non-profit Common Sense Media. Your behavior can have an impact on what influences your teen during this large proportion of their time.

One precaution you can take is to search for yourself on Google and see if what you find reflects the type of person you want to model to your teen. You should also learn about parental controls for devices and apps on your family’s network and find out about the apps your teen is using and what precautions you need to take for them. Avoid taking arguments online to social media in front of your teen. Lastly, try scheduling down time where your family can be together offline.

As Featured On

DrPhil_Season_7_title_card1-250x139oprah-logo-250x1091PLATFORMforgoodParentingTodaysKidssunsentinelGaltimeFoxNews1Forbes-Magazine-Logo-Fonthuffington-post-logo
family online safetyTodayMomsusatodaywashpostabcnewsCNN-living1anderson-cooper-360-logo-250x107cbs_eve_logobostonglobe-250x250nbc6newsweek

..and many more.

  • Facebook

    For every parent that is struggling with their teenager - 18 comes very fast. A must read via Grown and Flown ...

    THIS IS ADOLESCENCE: 18 18 is a year overflowing with contradictions. Eighteen wants to be a child forever and yet he cannot wait to grow up. He loves his house and cannot wait to leave it. Eighteen is our teen living in our home and in the same momentous year, an adult residing in another state. On the eve of his 18th birthday it seems almost as if nothing has changed and then one morning in August everything is different. 18 is a year of contradictions, of being our child at home and an adult living in another state. 18 is the year I have dreaded since the day he was born. It is the year that I will begin to know him a little less, the year when more of his life happens away from our family than within it. But 18 is also the year I am most grateful for, that as his childhood ends it has been filled with joy and he has thrived wrapped in our love and that of his brothers. Eighteen cannot believe he is 18. When I tell him that he must register for the selective service and to vote, that I can no longer deal with his doctor, the health insurance company or his college housing office, he is taken aback. Eighteen wants to be an adult, but not if it means a lot of paperwork. Eighteen wants to spend every spare minute with his friends. He dreads the day when one by one they will leave for college and he tells me how much he will miss them, how much their closeness has meant to him and that he hopes they will stay that way forever. While I am indebted to these wonderful boys who have taught my son so much about friendship, I ignore the tightness in my throat and do not say that I feel the same way about him. Eighteen needs to show me he is a grown up, even at the times when I know that he is not. When he is unhappy with me he reminds me that soon he will be gone and then I will not be able to tell him what to do. Eighteen tells me this both because he wants me to acknowledge his independence and because he wants to hurt me that little bit, because in getting ready to go, some small part of him is hurting too. When Eighteen defies me, I can see that my arsenal for controlling him is severely depleted. Eighteen is brimming with confidence. His confidence comes from the physical strength and stamina of youth, from being surrounded by those who have known and loved him most or all of his life and from the fact that we may all be at our most beautiful the summer of our 18th birthdays. Eighteen loves senior year in high school and life at the top of the social food chain. He loves knowing most of the teachers and coaches in his high school and the way they have begun to treat him and the other seniors like young adults. While I delight in seeing him so at ease in his world, I also know that there is nobody less secure than a college freshman. Eighteen thinks the drinking age is 18. I am the bearer of bad news. Eighteen thinks he should not have a curfew. I bear more bad news. Eighteen’s personal hygiene is impeccable. He has never needed to be reminded to shower or brush his teeth. He rarely leaves a mess in the house and usually cleans any garbage from my car when he borrows it. Yet, Eighteen still leaves every article of dirty clothing on his bedroom floor. He has been told 4,287 that there is a laundry hamper in his room. Fearing that he has forgotten, I remind him again. He wonders why I do this, and so do I. Surely there is a point where I should give up, but how will I know when that is? In the summer before he leaves, Eighteen wants to push his father and me away and hold onto us at the same time. I am told that as the reality of their leaving begins to confront some kids, they “soil the nest,” at times giving parents some of their very worst behavior. I try to remember that this is temporary and that if I have learned anything about parenting it is that a markedly changed adolescent will be returned to me come the winter holidays. Eighteen lies on the floor petting his dog. I am in the next room, but I can hear him telling her that he will miss her. He does not remember life before this dog and is old enough to fully understand that this means that in the coming years he will experience the loss of her. He feels love and he feels fear. He has heard that kids get “the call” at school about their dogs and he does not want that call. I can tell Eighteen what to do and what not to do, until he leaves for college. But that would be foolish. We are on a trial run for adulthood, so I let him make most of the decisions and step in only when I cannot help myself. I try not to treat him like the child he no longer is, he tries not to act like the obnoxious teenager he no longer is. Most of the time we are successful, sometimes we fail. Eighteen leaves little gashes on my heart, like stinging paper cuts, as time winds down and we no longer have months or years but rather weeks and days. I miss him before he is even gone and I grieve once he has left. Eighteen drifts slowly away the summer after graduation and then one morning I load up the car and he is really gone, and I can do nothing more than help him on his way. www.facebook.com/grownandflown/

    View on Facebook
  • RSS Sue Scheff Blog

    • Summer Slump: Teens and Social Media July 18, 2017
      Summer can be a great time for teens to decompress from school and their hectic schedule of running from events and squeezing in your homework and studying for exams. They will also have more time for social media, which isn’t all bad.  Especially if they are in high school and going to be applying to […]
    • Two-Thirds of Americans Witness Online Harassment and Abuse July 14, 2017
      In a recent PEW Research Survey, Online Harassment, 66% of Americans say they have witnessed some type of harassing behavior directed toward others online, with 39% indicating they have seen others targeted with severe behaviors such as stalking, physical threats, sustained harassment or sexual harassment. The good news is people are starting to take cover (implement […]
    • Digital Parenting – How to Keep Your Teens Safe Online May 12, 2017
      Keeping teens and tweens safe online continues to be a growing issue that concerns parents everywhere. Statistics indicate that 20% of youths receive hateful or harassing messages via the internet. This is not what a parent likes to hear. As a parent, you want to protect your children from dangers both in real life and […]

To get help, CLICK HERE or call us at 954-260-0805
P.U.R.E. does not provide legal advice and does not have an attorney on staff.
^ Back to Top
Copyright © 2001-2017 Help Your Teens. Optimized Web Design by SEO Web Mechanics Site Map