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Teen Help Blog

Missing Medicine? It Could Be a Sign of Medicine Abuse

Posted by Sue Scheff on May 26, 2017  /   Posted in Mental Health, Mental Illness, Parenting Teens

Does the scenario highlighted in the video below seem familiar?

I hope not, but the reality is that missing medicine could be a sign of over-the-counter (OTC) medicine abuse. It’s common to hear about teens abusing illegal drugs, alcohol and even prescription medication to get high, but many parents don’t realize that teens may also abuse OTC cough medicine.

If this is news to you, you may be wondering, why would teens abuse OTC cough medicine?

Teens often abuse OTC cough medicine because it’s affordable and easy to access. They may also mistakenly believe that it’s safer to abuse than illegal drugs.

The good news is that there are things you can do to help prevent your teen from abusing OTC cough medicine.

Educate yourself.

The first step is education. Learn about dextromethorphan (DXM), the active ingredient in most OTC cough medicines. Learn how to identify which products contain DXM by looking for the Stop Medicine Abuse icon. Become familiar with what DXM abuse looks like.

Monitor.

In addition to being on the lookout for missing medicine, it is also important to monitor your teen’s behavior for warning signs and side effects including:

  • Loss of interest in hobbies
  • Hostile and uncooperative attitude
  • Use of slang terms
  • Changes in friends
  • Declining grades
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Confusion, slurred speech and disorientation

Communicate with your teen.

Have a conversation with your teen about the risks of medicine abuse. Ask your teen if he or she has ever been exposed to DXM abuse or whether it’s something that’s discussed amongst peers. The reality is that one out of three teenagers knows someone who has abused OTC cough medicine to get high. That’s scary to think about, but teens who learn about the risks of substance abuse from their parents are 50 percent less likely to use drugs.

Share what you’ve learned.

It’s also important to communicate with other parents, teachers and community members to spread awareness. These conversations can be had at sports games, school activities or parent events to help inspire other parents to become vigilant against cough medicine abuse.

Parents can’t protect their teenagers from all the dangers of the world, but with education, close monitoring and a supportive community… parents can prevent OTC medicine abuse.

You can get more information at StopMedicineAbuse.org or join the conversation by following Stop Medicine Abuse on Facebook and Twitter.

Contributor: Anita Brikman joined the Consumer Healthcare Products Association (CHPA) in 2016 and leads the association’s communications and public affairs functions. As a member of the senior management team, she is responsible for establishing and directing the organization’s communications strategies and goals. Anita is passionate about healthcare issues, with over two decades of experience as a news anchor and health reporter in major television markets – making medicine abuse awareness and prevention efforts important to her. She is also the mother of three teenagers.

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100 Deadliest Days on the Road

Posted by Sue Scheff on May 26, 2017  /   Posted in Parenting Teens, Teen Help

AT&T stresses IT CAN WAIT message

Memorial Day marks the start of the 100 deadliest days , when the average number of teens dying from car crashes is 16 percent higher than the rest of the year, according to AAA. That’s because teens are on the road more during the summer months. During this time of year, more parents are also on the road while taking their kids to swim lessons, baseball, softball, summer camp, and more.

AT&T is using the Memorial Day Weekend as an opportunity to remind young drivers, and their parents, to never let their smartphones distract them behind the wheel. And a good first step is to take the pledge at www.itcanwait.com to keep your eyes on the road, not on your phone and encourage your family, friends and neighbors to do the same. AT&T launched the It Can Wait campaign in 2010 to help put an end to texting and driving. Since that time, AT&T research has revealed smartphone distracted driving has grown beyond texting to video chatting, emailing, web surfing, photo snapping, posting to social media, and more.

In addition to taking the IT CAN WAIT pledge, AT&T encourages drivers to use a free app, like AT&T DriveMode, to help curb the temptation to engage in texting while driving. This is especially important for teen drivers, since texting is their primary mode of communication. The DriveMode app silences incoming text messages and sends an auto-reply to the sender letting the person know you’re driving. The app’s auto-mode feature automatically turns on the app when you reach 15 MPH and turns it off after you stop. And parents will receive a notification if their teen driver turns off the app. The AT&T DriveMode app is available to customers of all wireless carriers for iPhone and Android users.

AT&T has also added a virtual reality experience component to the IT CAN WAIT campaign to show the potentially deadly consequences of glancing at your smartphone while driving. You can download the free AT&T VR app and buy Google Cardboard at www.ItCanWait.com/VR to use with your smartphone to experience the IT CAN WAIT driving simulation.

Lastly, AT&T encourages you to get involved with the IT CAN WAIT movement and educate others in your community and workplace about the dangers of smartphone distracted driving. You could just save a life.

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7 Tips You Can Start Using Now to Help Your Teen Gain Financial Success

Posted by Sue Scheff on May 04, 2017  /   Posted in Parenting Teens, Teen Help

According to a Sallie Mae study, more than 84% of college students have credit cards and 20% graduate owing more than $7,000.

Although it can be a good thing to open credit cards early in life, collecting debt that you cannot repay is never good.

At 18, your child can get a credit card without your consent.

Start talking to your children about the importance of financial security before they begin making uneducated decisions on their own. This should happen before they go to college for the best chance of financial success.

  1. Start the conversation early – As soon as your child is old enough to understand the concepts of earning, borrowing and paying, it’s time to start talking about credit. Explain the fundamentals of credit cards and how they work, including repayment plans and interest rates. You’ll find that life is full of teachable moments, so continue the conversation whenever you see an opportunity to reinforce positive behaviors or warn about negative ones.
  2. Explain how credit scores work – With a basic knowledge of how credit cards work, your child may soon be ready to learn about credit scoring. This conversation can become very detailed, but it’s okay to start with the basics. Let your child know that these bureaus are monitoring how you use credit and you are graded on their assessment, much like you would be graded on an exam.
  3. Help Her Build New Credit – Every child is different, so there isn’t a magic age where it makes sense to give your child a credit card. If your child is mature and shows that he or she is responsible with money, you may want to co-sign on a card while he or she is still a minor. This will give your child a head start on building credit. By the time he is 18, he could already have built new credit that will increase his credit score.
  4. Start a Savings Account – Children under the age of 18 cannot legally open a savings account on their own, but you can open a joint account for your child at any time. Having her name on the account will give her some flexibility to make financial decisions, and because you are involved in setting up the account, you can open a dialogue about how to save money. The way you approach this will depend on your child’s age and your own preferences, but you should offer some guidance on how your child uses the account. For example, you may require that all money goes into the savings account before any purchases are made. Review the balance regularly and discuss things like future purchases and how to save more money.

If you want a savings account that your child cannot access, consider a 529 College Savings Plan. This is a state-sponsored program available in many states. You can contribute to this savings plan without being taxed.

  1. Start a Retirement Savings Account – It may seem premature to start saving for retirement when your child is still in diapers, but this is one small thing you can do to help secure her financial future. There’s now a kid-friendly Roth IRA that parents can fund before their kids even enter the workforce. Parents can save money for their children’s retirement tax-free, as they would with a standard IRA. The account may continue growing as the child grows. As your child begins working, propose matching all or some of the money she invests throughout college.
  2. Create a budget and task them to report back – For many children, college is the first time they are living away from home. With such freedom comes responsibility that some are simply not prepared to handle. You can help by getting involved with creating and maintaining a budget. This is especially prudent if the child is receiving an allowance.
  3. Create an investment portfolio – You can start investing in mutual funds on your child’s behalf at any time. However, since this is a long-term investment, try to keep the risks on the low to moderate side.

One of the greatest gifts you can give your child is financial intelligence. When he understands how and why he is making smart financial decisions, he is more likely to continue following that pattern.

The simple act of opening a dialogue about finances sends the message that money is never a taboo topic. Armed with a healthy attitude towards finances, your child is less likely to accumulate crippling debt and more likely to achieve financial success.

Contributor: Trevor McDonald

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Extraordinary Summer Camps Bring Grieving Children Together

Posted by Sue Scheff on April 24, 2017  /   Posted in Mental Health, Parenting Teens, Summer Camps, Teen Help

Experience Camps, a national non-profit organization that provides free, one-week camps for children who have experienced the death of a parent, sibling or primary caregiver, is highlighted in Sheryl Sandberg’s newest book, Option B: Facing Adversity, Building Resilience, and Finding Joy.

After losing their father, Sheryl’s children attended Experience Camps (the California camp location), with other kids whose loved ones have died. Along with swimming, arts and crafts, and team sports, the kids take part in bereavement activities including sharing circles where they are encouraged to talk about their grief.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, approximately 1.5 million children are living in a single-family household due to the death of one parent. In the book, Sheryl talks about how her own children benefitted from attending Experience Camps, week-long summer camps that bring together children experiencing grief; and the value of support groups connecting you with others who really get what you are going through.

Excerpt from Option B: Facing Adversity, Building Resilience, and Finding Joy. Pgs. 1884 – 1885. Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group.

“Support groups connect you with others who really get what you are going through. Deep human connection. It is not just ‘Oh, I feel bad for you’ but ‘I actually understand…….My kids also attended Experience Camps, a free weeklong program for children who have lost a parent, sibling, or primary caregiver. Two of the core values at the camp are building community and inspiring hope. In one exercise, kids went to stations to confront an emotion associated with grieving. For anger, kids used chalk to scrawl words that made them angry on the pavement. Some wrote “bullying”; others wrote “cancer” or “drugs.” Then on the count of three they threw water balloons on the ground to smear the words away and release their anger. At a second station, a camper held a brick representing guilt. As the brick became too heavy, another camper shared the burden of its weight. These exercises helped show my children that their emotions were normal and other kids felt them too.” – Sheryl Sandberg

“We are so honored to be mentioned in Option B and are appreciative of Sheryl’s impact on the conversation around grief and resilience. She will inspire more people to seek connections and support to help them get through whatever challenges they face,” said Sara Deren, Founder and Executive Director of Experience Camps. “At Experience Camps, we encourage children to find those same connections through the camaraderie and community of camp and by allowing them to realize they’re not the only ones who have experienced loss.”

In 2017, Experience Camps will have more than 450 campers at camps in Maine, California, New York, and Georgia.

For more information about Experience Camps, visit http://www.experience.camp. Follow us on Facebook or Twitter.

About Experience Camps

Experience Camps is a place where kids can laugh, cry, play, create, remember the person who died, or forget the grief that weighs them down.  It’s a place where they can feel “normal”, because everyone there has been through something similar and understands what it’s like to lose someone important to them. Along with swimming, arts and crafts, and team sports, the kids take part in bereavement activities including sharing circles where they are encouraged to talk about their grief. Experience Camps is a home away from home. And just about everyone will tell you…”It’s the best week of the year”.

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The Relationship Between Bullying and Drug Abuse

Posted by Sue Scheff on April 12, 2017  /   Posted in Mental Health, Parenting Teens, Struggling Teen Help

Bullying is a major problem for teens. It is estimated that at least 50% of teen suicides can be attributed to bullying, and suicide is the 3rd leading cause of death among young people. Bullying also leads to depression, loss of motivation, personality change, self-harm, eating disorders, and substance abuse. It is already estimated that 1 in 3 teens experiment with drugs or alcohol by the time they finish the eighth grade. Bullying only increases the chances that your child will try drugs or alcohol. Spotting the signs of bullying before it becomes too severe can prevent teens from hurting themselves or developing an addiction.

Addiction can either begin rapidly or manifest over time. Bullying causes trauma, and trauma can follow a person for a lifetime. This trauma can cause a person to look for outlets and ways to feel better, or ways just to forget. Most addicts suffer from another underlying mental illness, and this often times was directly caused or triggered by emotional trauma. Drugs can often be a safe haven for someone suffering from trauma, anxiety, and/or depression. Drugs offer a false sense of confidence and happiness that bully victims lack; this is why it can be so hard for a bully victim to put down drugs.

Here are some ways to understand teens and addiction:

Skipping school

Bully victims often will skip school out of fear of harassment by their bully. This can lead to mischievous activities or risk taking. When a person begins skipping school or extracurricular activities they may begin to hang around people who are doing the same things. This can introduce your child to a “bad crowd” that may already be experimenting with drugs or alcohol. Teens who have friends or acquaintances who use drugs are far more likely to experiment. 

Low self esteem 

Bully victims often develop low self-esteem and self-worth. Drugs offer a false sense of confidence that seem to “fix” this problem. A person eventually finds that they need drugs or alcohol to feel normal or like they fit in.

Isolation

Bully victims lose motivation and interest in others. When they begin to abuse drugs this is exacerbated. A child may begin to stay out late, avoid friends and family, or stay in their room for long periods of time.

Personality changes

Bully victims and those suffering from addiction both begin to have significant personality changes. They lose interest in their favorite hobbies and activities. If they were once out-going they may become more introverted and lonely. Bully victims often become very depressed and find drugs or alcohol a way to “self-medicate”.

Bullies are at risk, too.

There is research that suggests that bullying perpetrators are also at risk.  Amanda Nickerson, PhD, Professor and Director of the Alberti Center for Bullying Abuse Prevention at University of Buffalo stated that “A fair amount of research has found higher rates of substance use among bullying perpetrators.”

Bullies often have turbulent lives at home or other underlying mental health issues which leads to their mischievous activities like violence, sexual promiscuity, and drug use.

Parents also play a vital role in protecting their children. It is common for parents or teachers to brush of bullying as “kids being kids” or that it is just “part of growing up”. Parents who can support their children and report bullying effectively have a high likelihood of preventing their children from trying drugs. This is crucial because teens who experiment with drugs are far more likely to develop and addiction later in life. Avoiding the perception of neglect plays a vital role in parenting and prevents childhood trauma.

Another study at the University of Buffalo examined 119 teens who said they had consumed alcohol in the past month. “They found teens who were severely bullied and who had strong support from their mothers and family cohesion—such as family members asking each other for help and spending free time together—were less likely to drink than bullied teens without strong maternal support and tight family bonds.”

Always talk to your child about bullying and take their concerns seriously. Addressing bullying quickly can mean the difference between development of an addiction or childhood trauma.

Contributor: Trevor McDonald

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Teens and Yoga: Balancing the Benefits and Improving Teen Depression

Posted by Sue Scheff on April 04, 2017  /   Posted in Mental Health, Parenting Teens, Teen Help

 No matter how mature teens may look, the truth is that they’re still kids in some way. They lack experience adults have, they don’t have enough freedom to make decisions on their own, but most importantly, they are way more vulnerable than grown ups. That’s why certain situations and issues that may seem like not a big deal for people in their 30s or even late 20s, oftentimes is the end of world for teens.

If you have kids and they’re already old enough to be called teenagers, then you’re likely to know how emotionally unstable and thin-skinned they sometimes can be. It takes very little to make them angry or sad, and it’s likely to give you hard times staying calm and balanced when they act this way.

Is there any solution to help teens handle all the hurdles happening to them on their way to adulthood? Sure, there are plenty of them. But the goal of this article is to focus on one of the most effective yet commonly undervalued methods – yoga practice.

So what are the biggest benefits? 

Gentle Physical Activity  

Those who say that yoga is not a serious physical exercise have never practiced yoga professionally. Some static asanas, which might look like an easy thing to do, require a great level of endurance, physical strength, and mental focus. And while it’s true that 30 minutes of yoga do not equal 30 minutes of running or swimming in terms of energy spending and calories burn, it doesn’t mean yoga may not be considered as sport. And, as experts suggest, yoga can bring in health benefits that otherwise would be out of reach.

Powerful Mental Practice  

According to a Harvard-based research, yoga is so powerful that it can improve depression, anxiety, and overall well-being by 50, 30, and 65 percent accordingly. No matter what the root causes of your teen’s emotional and psychological problems are, yoga can help manage and sometimes even completely eliminate the problem. For instance, if your teenager is going through the very first romantic breakup or is trying to improve self-confidence and social skills in college, yoga can be of great help. 

Additional Social Interaction 

Although remarkably social and easy-going teenagers do exist, the majority of teens find it hard making new friends and building relationships in the new surrounding. As a result, some of them feel lonely and lack vital social life that make our lives so interesting, valuable, and meaningful. For those teens who are naturally shy and uneasy, attending yoga classes might help establish new bonds or even make friends. In nearly all cases, people attending yoga are friendly and open-minded. Now add to that a common interest to yoga, and you get a perfect environment for practicing communication skills. 

Unobvious Educational Benefits

It might sound a little counterintuitive, but yoga practice is linked to improved academic performance and cognitive function. Since teenagers are living in a high-pace lifestyle, desperately trying to balance between education, personal life, family, and extracurricular activities, it makes their lives a big mess. Under the circumstances, it might be really hard to stay focused on learning a poem by heart or getting ready for an upcoming math test. Regular yoga practice is what trains our mind to be resistant to noises and other forms of distraction when there is a need to concentrate, which is a great skill for those who need to spend plenty of time studying.

So what’s the bottom line? 

It takes time and wisdom to master the art of stress management. That’s why young and open-minded people, our teens, might find it really hard to deal with daily hardships happen every now and then. The role of adults, in this regard, is to help teens train their psychological skills and resistance to stress, and yoga seems to be up for the task. The list of benefits it has is too long to be published in an article like that, but even the four advantages described above are enough to give yoga classes a try.

Contributor:  Amy Williams, a journalist and former social worker passionate about parenting and education.  You can follow Amy on Twitter.

 

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Best (And Not-so-usual) Hobbies to Inculcate in Teens

Posted by Sue Scheff on March 27, 2017  /   Posted in Parenting Teens, Teen Help

Most kids and teens have very particular hobbies and extracurricular interests. Some love to read, others love sports. Then there are the avid gamers, the skateboarders and the writers. The list could go on and on, because every kid is different.

There are many interests that parents don’t align with youth but that provide an educational outlet or a unique perspective on the world. For parents looking to round out their child’s interests and encourage an extracurricular avenue that diverts from the norm—in a good way—here are a few unconventional hobbies to introduce into the lives of kids:

  1. Chess. While many associate chess with a proclivity towards math and academia, chess is simply a game of skill and strategy. Chess teaches problem solving and hones planning skills. A player must always anticipate an opponent’s next move and be able to visualize the moves on the board.
  2. Astronomy. Not to be confused with astrology—e.g. horoscopes! Studying the stars, constellations and viewing planets through a telescope helps teach kids about the vastness of our universe. Seeing the depths of space and viewing the many celestial bodies of the universe also help teens understand that we are all part of a larger picture.
  3. Gardening. We live in a fast-paced society and so many families have to rush through a drive-through on the way to the next game, meeting or recital. Planting a garden allows teens and all members of the family to appreciate how our food is grown and harvested. Growing produce also provides clean food while teaching self-sufficiency. To make the endeavor a bit more fun for teens, pick a creative theme for your garden.
  4. Improv. Public speaking is an important skill that can be learned but never taught. Encourage kids to overcome the fear of the public through improv classes and performances. Improv teaches the ability to problem solve and uses imagination. Plus, it’s ok to laugh if you make a mistake.
  5. Role-playing games. Much like improv, games like Dungeons and Dragons encourage an ability to think skillfully. They also encourage imaginative ideas and foster creativity.
  6. Archery. For teens that maybe aren’t athletically inclined but who still want to participate in a sport, pursue archery. The game requires stealth, skill and helps work on hand-eye coordination. Goals can be individualized per each player. Plus, a bow and arrow is absolutely en vogue…thanks to Katniss Everdeen.
  7. Creative fandom. For the teen who loves Harry Potter, Game of Thrones, Stranger Things or any popular franchise, encourage creative expressions of their fandom. Professional make-up artists have celebrated their own obsessive fandom by creating television show themed palettes, brush sets and other cosmetics collections. There are no limits to fandom creativity.
  8. Cosplay and Costumes. For the budding fashion designer, encourage cosplay. Have teens create costumes of their favorite characters to pay homage to a particular show, series or genre. Get really creative by mixing and mashing up characters…like a Jack Skellington Ewok!
  9. Sewing. While sewing has fallen out of popularity, learning how to sew is a fun and useful skill. Those interested in a career in fashion design should know their way around a sewing machine. And learning to quilt and embroider also takes the knowledge up a notch.
  10. Treasure hunting. No, this isn’t about finding a lost treasure…but teaching teens the value of thrift. Thrift store hobbyists have a knack of finding incredible treasures at fantastic prices. And thrifting also is a way to teach teens to be cautious and responsible with their money.

Encourage teens to adopt an out-of-the-ordinary hobby to add an extraordinary element of creativity to their lives. Find a new and unique hobby that speaks to their personality. Unique extracurricular activities help teens seen the world in a diverse light and allows them to branch out of their comfort zones.

Contributor: Amy Williams, a journalist and former social worker passionate about parenting and education. You can follow Amy on Twitter.

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Tips for Helping Teens With Homework

Posted by Sue Scheff on March 21, 2017  /   Posted in Parenting Teens, Teen Help

Parenting tips abound for raising teenagers, but often these strategies overlook the importance of teaching our children how to study or take advantage of the educational opportunities that come their way. As our sons and daughters make their way through the school system, they will inevitably be faced with homework. For most families, homework is a touchy subject that often leads to arguments, tears, and slamming doors.

Although we can’t take that calculus test for them, we can help by offering homework support so they can succeed today and tomorrow.

Listed below are eight ways we can embrace homework to help our kids prepare for their future:

Remain calm. Take a deep breath and focus on helping a teen. If we get upset, flustered, or judgmental we won’t be any good to our kids. If we are overwhelmed, we can bet our children are, too.

Help them prioritize. There will be days when the piles of work and chapters to be read seem unending, but we can help our children see the light at the end of the tunnel. Some teens respond better to finishing small easy tasks first so they can focus solely on more complicated assignments later. However, other students perform better when they knock out the harder work first. We know our children and can help them prioritize their assignments so they can stay on top of their courses.

Create an area ideal for studying and working on projects. Teens often want to listen to music, watch videos, or lay in their room while doing homework. Unfortunately, this can be distracting and prevent them from being productive. Help them stay on task by creating a comfortable work space with proper lighting and easy access to supplies. Even though we might not be able to find the cosine and tangent of a triangle, we can ensure they have sharpened pencils and erasers at their fingertips.

Seek help from the Internet. Today’s teens might be taking advanced courses and even college credit classes. For many of us, that means our sons and daughters are working with complicated theories and equations. It’s alright to admit we don’t know all the answers, but we can help them locate the proper resources to solve the problems. Look online for reputable sites or videos from professional teachers that explain concepts and model the proper techniques. A good site to consider is Khan Academy or scroll through the education section on YouTube. Sometimes it just takes a different explanation or perspective to help a child grasp new ideas.

Don’t work harder, work smarter. Take advantage of quiz sites like Kahoot! or Quizlet to help review for tests and make studying a little more fun. Use different fonts, like Comic Sans, when reading typed notes or go “old school” by writing notes out on paper to help with comprehension and memory.


Take small breaks. Homework can be overwhelming, especially if a teen is tired or frustrated. After extended periods of focused work, revitalize a teen with a short recess. Encourage them to get up, stretch, or take a mental breather for five to ten minutes. The key to using breaks is that they should have a clear beginning and ending to keep kids productive.

Get them organized. Most teens need help learning to organize and prioritize. Their rooms are a mess, their lockers are stuffed with papers, and nobody knows what is lurking in their cars. As our kids become more independent, they will need to learn how to keep track of assignments and schedules. Buy them a planner, install a scheduling calendar on their phones, or teach them how to track their commitments on a computer to make this job easier. Once they are organized, they can realistically look ahead and plan accordingly. Hopefully, this eliminates last minute projects or late nights.

It’s okay to let them fail. Unfortunately, if we are constantly stepping in and solving their problems, we are only setting them up for a serious reality check when they head out on their own when a college scholarship or employment is on the line. As a parent, it is hard to sit back and let your child crash and burn. However, teens need to fail every now and then so they can learn how to get back up. Thankfully, we can be there to dust them off and brainstorm ways to avoid a similar scenario in the future.

How do you support your teen when it comes to homework and learning study habits?

Contributor: Amy Williams, a journalist and former social worker passionate about parenting and education. You can follow Amy on Twitter.

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Racism: How Is It Affecting the Views of Teenagers Today?

Posted by Sue Scheff on March 10, 2017  /   Posted in Mental Health, Parenting Teens, Struggling Teen Help, Teen Help

We are living in an era where the color of your skin holds more significance than what is in your heart. People don’t care about what kind of person you are after finding out that you’re a Muslim.

Racism is spreading like cancer throughout the world. People often forget that they are all the same; no matter what family they belong to, what color their skin is or what God they worship. If one day we could rise above all the petty things like color, creed or language and start judging people on the basis of who they truly are, that will be the day we will be able to call ourselves civilized.

Unfortunately, that is far from reality. These days, young children get bullied because they’re black; adults have to deal with colleagues who criticize them only because they’re Muslims, people getting ragged in the subways and streets only because they’re disabled. Most of you are probably shocked by this; however, this is the reality. Racism has become a huge part of our lives – Such a big part that if we see a few children surrounding a black child, we don’t do anything about it. One thing we never realize is that Racism is the only thing that could kill a living person. They could be walking and talking normally, but from the inside, their self-respect is crushed and their conscious weighs down from all the hatred.

We’ve compiled a list of things that could happen when an individual faces more than a few racial comments every day…

Severe Stress and Depression

It’s more than obvious that a person who is teased every single day by colleagues, co-workers, class mates, etc. will be depressed. They will absolutely despise every single thing about the place they have to go to every day of the week. Honestly, any of these things are enough to ruin anyone’s day. If you’re one of the people that teased someone for being a Hindu, then you probably should stop, because you’re probably the reason they are distressed for the rest of the day.

Lowered Morale and Self-Esteemed

This is no hidden fact that a person who laughed at twenty times in the day would lose confidence in themselves. It can demoralize them and can reduce their capability to work. All of you are probably familiar with Martin Luther King. He is the reason black people have the rights that they do today. Martin Luther King realized the fact that if America keeps on usurping the rights of black people, they will end up with a half broken and battered nation. This would, ultimately, start a war – A war that will take place inside America. From this, you can easily realize the effects that racism has on someone’s consciousness.

Suicides

There have been hundreds of cases when a teen that was abused at school ends up committing suicide. Even though there are a very small amount of cases of adults committing suicide, their frustration is no less than teenagers. Insults over insults are enough to ruin someone’s day. However, when the insults are directed to someone’s color, creed or religion, this might push someone to the extent of committing suicide.

How is Racism Hurting the Minds of Teens?

So, what happens when teens witness racism all day long? Does a Christian kid become happy when someone mocks a Muslim? Does a white child feels amused when someone laughs at a black teen? The answer is Yes. Our society has become one where racism is no longer considered death to social life, however, people enjoy it. Think about it yourself, when was the last time you stood up for someone being teased? We are living in a world where racism makes people feel a false sense of superiority as compared to the minorities – and it is needless to say, this isn’t playing well for teens.

How Can Parents Keep Children Safe From Racism?

Whether your child is a racist, or if they are being mocked by someone else, as a parent, it is your duty to protect them from either one. The best way to protect your children would be to use Parental Monitoring Applications. They are able to monitor all of your child’s conversations on their Smartphone, and you can know if your child is cyberbullying someone. You could use their own device’s camera and microphone and see if they aren’t getting bullied by someone at school. Hence, making sure that you protect your children from the disease that is racism itself… 

Author Bio: 

Nicki is a working mum writing blogs to help fellow mums use technological apparatus to make parenting easier in today’s era. Her work on cell phone tracking software has received great appreciation from a reader. To know more about her follow on twitter @nickimarie222

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What Career Path Is Your Teen Considering?

Posted by Sue Scheff on March 02, 2017  /   Posted in Parenting Teens, Summer Jobs, Teen Help

Do you remember the dread you felt as a kid when an adult asked what you wanted to be when you grew up?

CareerBuilder research shows that nearly 1 in 4 high school students pick their career based on something they saw on TV or in a movie, and 33 percent of full-time workers regret the college major they chose. In conjunction with Find Your Calling month, an initiative that empowers students to pick a career based on their interests, CareerBuilder is releasing a series of studies with surprising insights into labor market and hiring trends. Today’s release focuses on top occupations for younger workers.

CHICAGO and ATLANTA – March 2, 2017 – What do I want to do with my life? It is one of the most pressing and often overwhelming questions for America’s youth —and CareerBuilder is working to help them find the answer. Today, CareerBuilder launched Find Your Calling Month, a nationwide initiative taking place throughout March that encourages students to discover possible career and education paths and get them excited about the future.

 

CareerBuilder research shows that nearly 1 in 4 high school students pick their career based on something they saw on TV or in a movie1, and that 33 percent of full-time workers regret the college major they chose.2 As college debt rises, the skills gap widens and a significant number of workers fall prone to unemployment or underemployment, it is important to start educating students early about their options. 

 

CareerBuilder’s month-long initiative centers around its free national website FindYourCalling.com, which enables students to instantly view a wide range of careers based on their individual interests. Students can see job growth projections, salary ranges, companies hiring, educational programs and more, and can easily share that information on social media to get their friends to discover their own career paths as well. The initiative also enlists schools throughout the country to host Find Your Calling days and encourages parents and businesses to participate.

 

In conjunction with Find Your Calling month, CareerBuilder is releasing a series of studies that provide surprising insights into labor market and hiring trends. Today’s release focuses on top occupations for younger workers based on jobs that are growing quickly, pay a good wage and have a solid concentration of workers ages 19 to 24.

“There is a world of opportunity open to younger workers in business, technical and creative fields,” said Rosemary Haefner, chief human resources officer at CareerBuilder. “When choosing a potential career, you want to ask yourself two questions: 1) What am I passionate about? and 2) Does data show that this occupation is growing and pays well? The more informed you are about your options and what it takes to get to where you want to be, the better the outcome.”

The study is based on data from Emsi, CareerBuilder’s labor market analysis arm, which pulls information from nearly 100 national, state and local employment resources.

1 CareerBuilder’s nationwide survey of 210 high school seniors conducted by Harris Poll, June 2015
2 CareerBuilder’s nationwide survey of 2,851 full-time workers conducted by Harris Poll, June 2016

About CareerBuilder®
CareerBuilder is a global, end-to-end human capital solutions company focused on helping employers find, hire and manage great talent. Combining advertising, software and services, CareerBuilder leads the industry in recruiting solutions, employment screening and human capital management. It also operates top job sites around the world. Owned by TEGNA Inc. (NYSE:TGNA), Tribune Media (NYSE:TRCO) and McClatchy (NYSE:MNI), CareerBuilder and its subsidiaries operate in the United States, Europe, South America, Canada and Asia. For more information, visit www.careerbuilder.com.

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