^ Back to Top
954-260-0805

Monthly Archives December 2016

Tips to Teach Your Teen the True Meaning of Holiday Giving

Posted by Sue Scheff on December 08, 2016  /   Posted in Parenting Teens

Holiday spending was up 16 percent this Thanksgiving weekend, with Americans spending $9.36 billion, Voice of America reported. This included $4.1 billion in online spending, a 15 percent increase from last year, according to Adobe Digital Insights. The average shopper spent $289, National Retail Federation data showed. By the time the holidays are over, each American shopper will have spent an average of $929, up from $882 last year. Amidst this frenzy of spending, it’s easy for teens to get the impression that Christmas is all about getting presents and to forget the original reason for the season. Here are some ways you can help offset the commercialization of Christmas and teach your teen the spirit of goodwill.

Leading by Example

The most powerful lesson you can give your teen is teaching by example. Embodying and exhibiting a spirit of generosity can give your teen a role model to counter the materialistic messages of the mass media. Minimalist author Joshua Becker suggests some simple ways to be more generous. Start by cultivating a spirit of gratitude within yourself, making a list of things you are grateful for and reminding yourself of your list on a daily basis. Make a habit of giving a portion of your income each month to your church or a charitable cause. Give up one luxury item for a month in order to increase your ability to give. Give away items you don’t need. Spend some time helping people in need on a regular basis.

Shift Focus from Gifts to Faith and Family

Christmas was originally a religious holiday celebrated in a family setting, but in the late 19th century, woodcutters and department stores began seeing its commercial potential, setting the stage for the increasing commercialization of the holiday over the course of the 20th century. Today, Christmas stands at the center of the retail economy. You can help reverse this trend for your teen by bringing your holiday season back to its original focus and emphasizing faith and family.

There are a number of simple steps you can take to emphasize faith and family over the holidays. Adorn your home with religious-themed decorations to give your family a daily visual reminder of the reason for the season. Participate in holiday rituals such as lighting Advent candles. Or you can organize family activities that emphasize faith and fellowship rather than just giving gifts. Adriel Booker lists 150 Advent activitiesfamilies can do together, ranging from preparing decorations and treats to watching Christmas movies and attending holiday parades and religious celebrations.

Volunteer to Help the Less Fortunate

One great way to model a spirit of generosity for your teen is volunteering as a family to help the less fortunate. There are numerous ways you can get your teen involved in this type of charitable activity. One of the simplest ways is to see what your local church may already be doing. Many churches organize Christmas activities such as collecting gifts for needy children, serving meals or visiting nursing homes. You can also find charitable organizations such as the Salvation Army that organize holiday activities you can participate in. Or you can find people in need among your own family, friends and neighbors to help over the holidays. One activity for the family could be delivering homemade cookies in a family “Cookie Car”decorated for the holidays.

Set a Budget Ceiling

Despite the fact that the average American spends over $900 a year on holiday shopping, two-thirds of Americans don’t plan a holiday budget, a Bankrate survey revealed. Moreover, two-thirds of those who do have budgets don’t stick to them, going an average of $116 over budget, a Coinstar survey found. Setting a budget ceiling for your family’s gift spending can help your teen focus less on gifts during the holiday season.

There are several ways you can limit gift spending. One is to set a numerical limit for each family member. Another is to assign family members to buy gifts for each other through a random drawing, with a set limit on how much may be spent per gift.

Make Gifts by Hand

Another way to limit gift spending while personalizing your gifts at the same time is to have your teen make gifts by hand. For instance, if your teen knows how to knit, they might make a hat, scarf or mittens. If they like to bake, they can make some homemade cookies or brownies to share. Or if they’re handy with tools, they might build a small furniture or decorative item to give away.

Tags: ,,

Cellslip: The Gift of Saving Lives

Posted by Sue Scheff on December 07, 2016  /   Posted in Parenting Teens

pixabaytextingdrivingNo one needs to be reminded of the deadly statistics of distracted driving, especially as it pertains to teen drivers.  However let’s review some of them again from Distracted Driving Accidents:

  • 1 out of 4 car accidents in the US are caused by texting while driving.
  • Texting and driving is 6 times more likely to get you in an accident than drunk driving. That’s right, it is actually safer for someone to get wasted and get behind the wheel than to text and do it.
  • It takes an average of three seconds after a driver’s mind is taken off the road for any road accident to occur. This is the bare minimum amount of time it takes, and it is surprisingly small. Three seconds is the time it takes to turn your ignition when starting your car.
  • Every day, 11 teenagers die because they were texting while driving.
  • 94% of teenagers understand the consequences of texting and driving, but 35% of them admitted that they do it anyway.
  • Of all the teenagers ever involved in fatal accidents every year, 21% were using a cell phone at the time of the accident.
  • Teen drivers have a 400% higher chance of being in a car crash when texting while driving than adults.
  • 25% of teens respond to at least one text while driving, every single time.
  • 10% of adults and 20% of teenagers have admitted that they have entire conversations over text message platforms while driving.
  • 52% of these talk on the phone while driving, and 32% text on the road.
  • When teens text while they drive, they veer off lane 10% of their total drive time.

cellslip3Finally there is a perfect gift that can save lives, including your teenager’s life. Cellslip is an easy to use pocket that they can insert their phone into before they start driving. It blocks all incoming calls and text messages so they can concentrate on the road. When you remove the phone from the pocket, all your messages are received! They won’t miss a thing! No FOMO! (Fear of missing out).

It’s bright red to remind you of the dangers of distracted driving.

They have partnered with AAA, so this insures they are a quality product for you and your family’s safety.

This is a perfect holiday gift, not only for your teenager or young adult in your life, but for that hard to buy for person.  Have a holiday office party? Give them a Cellslip!

Cellslip also will promote businesses by personalizing pouches with your company logo’s.

Order your’s today – check out family pack!

Holiday special PROMO CODE: Use SlipItOrTicket and get 30% off your order!

Tags: ,,,

Preventing Teen Medicine Abuse

Posted by Sue Scheff on December 02, 2016  /   Posted in Parenting Teens, Teen Help

stopmedabuse6By Anita Brikman

Awareness of a problem is the first step to solving it. Parents were recently spreading the word about teen over-the-counter (OTC) cough medicine abuse for National Medicine Abuse Awareness Month. Although October has come and gone, we can still continue to spread awareness and help other parents of teenagers just like us become aware of this serious issue.

While the abuse of OTC medicines doesn’t often receive the same media attention as the abuse of alcohol, marijuana or prescription medications, it’s still a common practice among today’s teens. In fact, one in 25 teenagers reports getting “high” by consuming up to 25 times the suggested amount of cough medicine.

stopmedabuse65Why the abuse of cough medicine?

Many teens believe that abusing cough medicine is less harmful than using other drugs because it’s legal and easy to attain. Unfortunately, they’re misinformed. Most cough medicine contains the active ingredient dextromethorphan (DXM), which has dangerous effects when taken in excess, such as hallucinations, vomiting, sweating and memory loss. The risks only get worse when DXM is combined with other substances, such as drugs or alcohol.

Here’s another problem. Due to the fact that cough medicine can be obtained easily and inexpensively, it’s an attractive choice for teen users. It’s also much easier to hide from parents. What parent would suspect risky behavior when they see an empty bottle of cough medicine in the trash? Unfortunately, only 50% of parents are aware of DXM abuse at all.

The  Stop Medicine Abuse campaign released this short but significant video highlighting one way parents can become more informed and help prevent abuse at home:

The Stop Medicine Abuse icon is included on OTC products, which contain DXM. Even without any knowledge of DXM, this icon alerts parents to stay vigilant about the potential for abuse.

With the hashtag #CheckYourShelf, the video encourages parents to monitor the amount of cough medicine in their home, safeguard their medicine cabinets and safely dispose of old/unused medicines. It also urges parents to check themselves by asking the following questions:

  • Am I aware of my teen’s habits and tendencies?
  • Do I have the kind of relationship where I can ask my teen important questions around risky behavior?
  • How can I start these conversations with my teen?

Informing parents about DMX abuse is the first step in preventing it. As the temperature drops and colds become more frequent, let’s continue to spread awareness about this critical issue, so parents know how the cough medicine in their home is being used.

You can get more information at www.StopMedicineAbuse.com or join the conversation by following Stop Medicine Abuse on Facebook and Twitter.

Contributor: Anita Brikman joined the Consumer Healthcare Products Association (CHPA) in 2016 and leads the association’s communications and public affairs functions. As a member of the senior management team, she is responsible for establishing and directing the organizations communications strategies and goals. Anita is passionate about healthcare issues, with over two decades of experience as a news anchor and health reporter in major television markets – making medicine abuse awareness and prevention efforts important to her. She is also the parent of three teenagers. Join the conversation by following Stop Medicine Abuse on Facebook and Twitter.

Tags: ,,,,

As Featured On

DrPhil_Season_7_title_card1-250x139oprah-logo-250x1091PLATFORMforgoodParentingTodaysKidssunsentinelGaltimeFoxNews1Forbes-Magazine-Logo-Fonthuffington-post-logo
family online safetyTodayMomsusatodaywashpostabcnewsCNN-living1anderson-cooper-360-logo-250x107cbs_eve_logobostonglobe-250x250nbc6newsweek

..and many more.


To get help, CLICK HERE or call us at 954-260-0805
P.U.R.E. does not provide legal advice and does not have an attorney on staff.
^ Back to Top
Copyright © 2001-2019 Help Your Teens. Optimized Web Design by SEO Web Mechanics Site Map