^ Back to Top
954-260-0805

ADHDBoy2Every parent wants their child to do well in school and succeed in life. It’s challenging to watch your teen’s grades slip, despite the time, attention and effort you put into helping them improve. This can be even more difficult for parents of children with ADHD. If your teen has ADHD and you’re looking for ways to help them improve their grades, we’ve gathered some tips below.

Unique tools

Kids with ADHD simply do not learn successfully under conventional methods. So it’s wise to try unconventional study methods.

Create a word puzzle to help your child with a specific subject which they are struggling in. Rather than simply reading a book and quizzing them on the information, this is a fun way to study that doesn’t feel like school work.

Have your teen review the information they studied for a few minutes just before they go to bed can also help them remember the information and process it while they sleep.

Break it up

According to PsychCentral.com, cramming for an exam simply doesn’t work. It can put added pressure and anxiety on your teen, which hinders them from understanding and remembering information. Experts suggest breaking up study time into increments for better success. For example, if your child has an exam in a week, ask them to study for 25 minutes each day leading up to it, rather than for hours the night before.

Don’t put the phone away

This one sounds counterproductive, but it actually isn’t. If your child is one of the millions of kids today with a smartphone, don’t ask him or her to put it down just yet. The apps and resources in smartphones can actually be helpful to your child.

For kids with ADHD, planning ahead is crucial. At the start of the school year or even a particular week, have your child note key due dates in the calendar of their phone. Also, have them set up reminders with the alert feature so they never miss something important. This article offers more insight — though geared toward college students, middle and high school students alike can benefit from the tips.

When studying, however, ask your child to put their phone in airplane mode or simply take the phone until they are finished to avoid distractions.

Physical activity

Physical activity is helpful in reducing stress, clearing the mind and getting blood flowing. But for kids with ADHD — and kids in general who may be dealing with the pressures that come with being a pre-teen or teenager — physical activity is even more important. Some experts even say that movement is medicine when it comes to ADHD, helping to increase attention and improve mood.

Even if your child is not interested in sports, make it a point to incorporate a brisk walk, bike ride or even a game of catch into family time. This can help with bonding and also bring forth the aforementioned benefits.

Above all, keep the lines of communication open with your child, assess what’s working on a regular basis and adjust your strategy as needed. It can be tough to help children with special needs help themselves. But with preparation and creativity, it will be easier for the two of you to achieve success together.

Contributor:  Joyce Wilson taught for decades. Now happily retired, she spends her days sharing her teaching knowledge with today’s teachers and hanging out with her grandchildren. She and a fellow retired teacher created TeacherSpark.org to share creative ideas and practical resources for the classroom.

 

As Featured On

DrPhil_Season_7_title_card1-250x139oprah-logo-250x1091PLATFORMforgoodParentingTodaysKidssunsentinelGaltimeFoxNews1Forbes-Magazine-Logo-Fonthuffington-post-logo
family online safetyTodayMomsusatodaywashpostabcnewsCNN-living1anderson-cooper-360-logo-250x107cbs_eve_logobostonglobe-250x250nbc6newsweek

..and many more.

  • Facebook

    Unable to display Facebook posts.
    Show error

    Error: An access token is required to request this resource.
    Type: OAuthException
    Code: 104
    Please refer to our Error Message Reference.
  • Follow @SueScheff

  • RSS Sue Scheff Blog

    • The Ongoing Tech Talk Debate November 13, 2019
      Why is the tech talk is more difficult than the sex talk? Your ongoing offline conversations are what helps keep your teen in-check online. It’s important that you don’t loose your cool and keep those lines of communication open, many of us realize this isn’t always easy. “Your teen may always be an app ahead […]
    • Best and Worst Social Media Platforms October 8, 2019
      Instagram, Snapchat, Facebook, Twitter, TikTok and more. The CyberSmile Foundation released their Social America report. As many people are anxiously waiting to hear if the ‘like‘ button will be removed on both Facebook and Instagram, over 20,000 young people (both Gen Z and Millennials) were surveyed about their favorite (and not so favorite) social media […]
    • Nobody’s Victim: Fighting Psychos, Stalkers, Pervs and Trolls September 16, 2019
      Power Pervs, When Troll Armies Attack, A$$holes in Charge, Swipe Right for Stalking… are some of the chapter titles in this empowering and brilliantly written book, Nobody’s Victim by Carrie Goldberg. As a victim (and survivor) of internet defamation, cyberbullying and online shaming, I consider myself very fortunate. Nobody’s Victim outlines some of the darkest […]

To get help, CLICK HERE or call us at 954-260-0805
P.U.R.E. does not provide legal advice and does not have an attorney on staff.
^ Back to Top
Copyright © 2001-2019 Help Your Teens. Optimized Web Design by SEO Web Mechanics Site Map