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Medical Health Insurance for Teen Help

Medical Health Insurance for Teen Help

Single Child Insurance Policy for Mental Health

If you live in the following states, AZ, CO, FL, IL, KS, MO, NC, TN, UT, and VA, Cigna Health Insurance offers a single child mental health insurance policy. Open enrollment starts on November 1, 2020. Call for more information – (866) 621-8181. You can also ask the school or program you are considering if they accept this policy.

Other insurance companies, such as Aetna may also offer this. It’s important to apply during their open enrollment.

Insurance Assistance

Need help filing your medical insurance?

Denials Management, Inc. or SJ Health Insurance Advocates  are insurance advocates that can help you fully investigate your potential insurance options. Contact them directly for more information.

Medicaid, HMO or Tricare Insurance

For families that have Medicaid, HMO or a Tricare health insurance policy, and you would like your medical benefits to cover your child’s behavioral modification program — please contact the number on your insurance card and ask them for residential treatment centers in your network. This way you will have coverage. Self-pay programs start at about $7000 per month and up. They usually will only accept PPO insurance policies.

Tricare may cover for some private programs. You can ask the program you are considering if they accept your Tricare policy, by running a verification of benefits (VOB).

HMO’s offer single case pay agreements (SCA).

A Single Case Agreement (SCA) is a contract between an insurance company and an out-of-network provider for a specific patient, so that the patient can see that provider using their in-network benefits (i.e., the patient will only have to pay their routine in-network co-pays for sessions after meeting their in-network deductible (if any).

DISCLAIMER P.U.R.E.  makes no claims to the accuracy of this content and makes no warranties or guarantees that the information will result in funding or even potential funding. This information is not intended as financial advice, and P.U.R.E.  is not responsible for the financial choices you make based upon this information. We highly recommend that you consult with a registered financial advisor or your accountant. Also, please take into consideration the entire breadth of your family’s financial obligations before selling any of your assets or entering into any kind of loan agreement, whether it be a personal or institutional loan.

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    Teen Entitlement Issues: The Spoiled Brat GenerationThe Life of a Privileged Teenager

    Many parents only want the best for their children (usually more than they had growing up), but has this actually backfired on families?

    In today’s society, many teens have major entitlement issues. Parents feel that giving their teens material items will somehow earn them respect. Quite frankly, the opposite occurs in most families. The more we give, the more our children expect and the less they respect us. We lose ourselves in buying our children’s love. At the end of the day, no one wins and life is a constant battle of anger, hopelessness, and debt.

    While interviewing a young teen who was recently given a brand new car, the young woman felt she deserved it since her parents gave her two used ones previously. She was only 17 years old and already controlling her household. She truly believed that she was entitled to this car, showing no appreciation of respect for her parents. Simply, she deserved it. Can you imagine owning three cars by the age of 17, yet never buying one? This is an extreme example, but a lot of parents can probably relate.

    Entitlement issues can lead to serious problems. Teaching your child respect and responsibility should be priority. Although the issues may have started to escalate, as a parent, it is never too late to take control of the situation and say no when your teen feels they are entitled to a frivolous item or anything that is considered a privilege.

    Life is about responsibility, and as parents we need to teach this to our children. Helping them comes natural to us; however, when it becomes excessive and the child doesn’t appreciate it, it is time to step back and evaluate your situation.

    Are you experiencing a spoiled rotten brat? Defiant, rebellious and out-of-control especially when they don’t get their own way? Are you at your wit’s end? Feel like you’re a hostage in your own home?

    Read 5 signs your teen might be entitled.

    P.U.R.E.™ invites you to fill out a free consultation form for more information on finding the appropriate help for your teen and your family.
    ...

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      3 C’s of Digital Civility Online Never doubt, our keyboards can be used as a tool or a weapon. It’s completely up to the user. I often hear, parents especially, that like to blame the apps or social platforms for cyberbullying, however we have to keep in mind that it’s human behavior that is using […]
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    • Prevent Cyberbullying: Stop Spreading Online Hate October 4, 2020
      3 Ways to Combat Online Hate There’s no question, 2020 has been a difficult year. Teens and tweens are spending even more time online as they are adapting to distancing learning virtually. It’s been a struggle both emotionally and socially for everyone. Different studies and surveys conclude that cyberbullying is on the rise, which is […]

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P.U.R.E. does not provide legal advice and does not have an attorney on staff.
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