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States with the Most At-Risk Teens for 2020 (During COVID)

COVID has no doubt, brought more challenges for parents of teenagers. Many are having difficulties with social distancing and online schooling.

Growing up can be hard. Without a stable home, positive role models and tools for success, many young Americans fall behind their peers and experience a rocky transition to adulthood. Today, about one in nine individuals between the ages of 16 and 24 are neither working nor attending school. Others suffer from poor health conditions that hinder their ability to develop physically or socially.

Such issues not only affect young people later in life, but they also prove harmful to society as a whole. For instance, more than 70 percent of young adults today are ineligible to join the U.S. military because they fail academic, moral or health qualifications.

Research shows that when youth grow up in environments with economic problems and a lack of role models, they’re more at risk for poverty, early pregnancy and violence, especially in adulthood. The environment is even more difficult for these young Americans in 2020, as the COVID-19 pandemic has hurt the job market, caused schools to be held online and kept people far more isolated than usual. The pandemic is also a cause of severe stress, and some youth may not have anyone to turn to for support.

With about one in nine young Americans today neither working nor in school, exposing them to greater risk of poverty and violence, the personal-finance website WalletHub released its report on 2020’s States with the Most At-Risk Youth, as well as accompanying videos.

To determine where young Americans are not faring as well as others in their age group, especially in a year made extremely stressful by the COVID-19 pandemic, WalletHub compared the 50 states and the District of Columbia across 16 key indicators of youth risk. The data set ranges from share of disconnected youth to labor force participation rate among youth to youth poverty rate.

States with Most At-Risk Youth States with Least At-Risk Youth
1. Louisiana 42. Virginia
2. District of Columbia 43. Iowa
3. Arkansas 44. Kansas
4. Alaska 45. Rhode Island
5. Mississippi 46. North Dakota
6. New Mexico 47. Minnesota
7. Alabama 48. New Hampshire
8. Nevada 49. Massachusetts
9. West Virginia 50. New Jersey
10. Oregon 51. Utah

Key Stats

  • Louisiana has the highest share of disconnected youth, 20.00 percent, which is 2.9 times higher than in North Dakota, the lowest at 7.00 percent.
  • New Mexico has the highest share of youth without a high school diploma, 17.30 percent, which is 2.4 times higher than in Hawaii, the lowest at 7.20 percent.
  • Mississippi has the highest share of overweight or obese youth, 56.01 percent, which is 1.7 times higher than in Idaho, the lowest at 32.97 percent.
  • Vermont has the highest share of youth using drugs in the past month, 38.41 percent, which is 2.3 times higher than in Utah, the lowest at 16.42 percent.
  • Nevada has the highest share of homeless youth, 0.52 percent, which is 26 times higher than in Mississippi, the lowest at 0.02 percent.

Have you exhausted your local resources? Therapy doesn’t work? Considering residential treatment? Learn more about quality help. Contact us today to find out if therapeutic boarding schools can help your teen.

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    Teen Entitlement Issues: The Spoiled Brat GenerationThe Life of a Privileged Teenager

    Many parents only want the best for their children (usually more than they had growing up), but has this actually backfired on families?

    In today’s society, many teens have major entitlement issues. Parents feel that giving their teens material items will somehow earn them respect. Quite frankly, the opposite occurs in most families. The more we give, the more our children expect and the less they respect us. We lose ourselves in buying our children’s love. At the end of the day, no one wins and life is a constant battle of anger, hopelessness, and debt.

    While interviewing a young teen who was recently given a brand new car, the young woman felt she deserved it since her parents gave her two used ones previously. She was only 17 years old and already controlling her household. She truly believed that she was entitled to this car, showing no appreciation of respect for her parents. Simply, she deserved it. Can you imagine owning three cars by the age of 17, yet never buying one? This is an extreme example, but a lot of parents can probably relate.

    Entitlement issues can lead to serious problems. Teaching your child respect and responsibility should be priority. Although the issues may have started to escalate, as a parent, it is never too late to take control of the situation and say no when your teen feels they are entitled to a frivolous item or anything that is considered a privilege.

    Life is about responsibility, and as parents we need to teach this to our children. Helping them comes natural to us; however, when it becomes excessive and the child doesn’t appreciate it, it is time to step back and evaluate your situation.

    Are you experiencing a spoiled rotten brat? Defiant, rebellious and out-of-control especially when they don’t get their own way? Are you at your wit’s end? Feel like you’re a hostage in your own home?

    Read 5 signs your teen might be entitled.

    P.U.R.E.™ invites you to fill out a free consultation form for more information on finding the appropriate help for your teen and your family.
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