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Teen Driving

How To Prevent Teen Distracted Driving

Posted by Sue Scheff on April 24, 2018  /   Posted in Parenting Teens, Teen Help

How to Prevent Teen Distracted Driving

Teenager drivers have increasingly become the major victims of road accidents today. This has been majorly due to extreme carelessness and unremitted distractions. Since the law allows teenagers to acquire driving license at an early age, the best alternative for curbing this menace is championing the various ways on how to prevent teen distracted driving.

Parents are usually the best teachers for their children. However, external enlightenment for teenagers is always provided by other organizations and groups.

Distractions that might overwhelm teens include personal grooming while driving, eating, and talking to passengers in the back seat. Besides some teens watch videos in the car and are often distracted by road maps. Additionally, loud music is rarely considered though deadly distraction for drivers. Distracted driving is causing more car accidents.

The Deadly Impact of Distracted Driving

Here are the major ways on how to prevent teen distracted driving. Parents are usually vested with a natural authority to help implement these methods.

Limiting cell phone use while driving

Messaging services and social media are usually the favorite phone applications for teens. They always feel compelled to update their peers constantly about their welfare. Though they have little driving experience and have spent fewer hours behind the wheels, they adamantly refuse to put their phones away.

However, teens should be reminded to always keep their phones off or on silent mode while driving.

They should not carry familiar passengers in the back seat

With friends at the backseat, stories always keep getting interesting. However, as the conversations continue, the driver gets distracted and is prone to lose control of the vehicle. Nevertheless, it is the role of parents to enact strict rules prohibiting their children from carrying friends in the back seat.

No driving under the influence of alcohol

Teens should not be allowed to go partying with their cars. They should use public transport instead. Alcohol causes disorientation and hallucinations that can be very detrimental while driving.

Grooming and eating before driving

This requires efficient time management skills so that teen do not multitask while driving shifting of attention can lead to serious fatalities.

Regulating the use of music

It is important to regulate the volume of playing music to increase concentration. Additionally, you should not keep on changing stations and selecting songs.

The overall effects of distracted teen driving are way more deadly. It is this reason that this article proves to be very important. However, you can get information to prevent distracted teen driving by consulting on legal implications from a car accident attorney.

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Car Responsibilities: How to Talk to Your Teen About Driving

Posted by Sue Scheff on February 27, 2018  /   Posted in Uncategorized

Driving is a major responsibility for anyone — although learning the proper mechanics is something teens in particular need to understand before getting on the road. Case in point: Six teens die every day from car crash injuries, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Knowing this information, if you’re working with your teen to get their learner’s permit or driver’s license, it’s time to sit down and have “the talk” — that is, about car responsibilities.

Be a Good Role Model

It’s no secret young people tend to emulate the actions, beliefs and attitudes of their parents, which is why you should always set a good example to teach and reinforce good habits. As such, when you get in your car, make it a habit (if it isn’t already) to put away your smartphone, fasten your seat belt and check your mirrors before starting the vehicle.

Additionally, you’ll always want to use your turn signal, follow the speed limit and keep your emotions in check. Never drink and drive or get behind the wheel if you aren’t feeling like yourself, and be open to discussing the decisions you make behind the wheel. Even if it doesn’t seem like it, your teen is watching you and will want to model your actions and behaviors.

Set Limits

When your teen gets their driver’s license, it’s important to set some important rules of the road beyond the relevant driving laws in your state. By clearly defining your expectations upfront, you’ll reduce conflicts, costly mistakes and other problems. Moreover, you’ll feel more confident and have better peace of mind about your teen’s driving abilities.

Fortunately, some states require teens to have progressive driving licenses that set limits on when they can drive and how many passengers are allowed in their vehicle at any one time. But even if your state doesn’t employ any restrictions for teen drivers, you should have open, honest discussions with your loved one about these important topics.

If you feel it necessary, draw up a safe driving contract with your teen to lay out any limits and responsibilities. For example, you may want to mention that they can only drive if they keep their grades up and stay out of trouble. Additionally, discuss any repercussions for distracted driving, including the use of their smartphone and ability to hang out with friends.

Continue the Discussion

Safe driving goes beyond explaining any important rules of the road. In fact, these conversations should be ongoing to ensure your teen maintains good driving habits and understands their responsibilities behind the wheel. While they should know the rules of the road, they also need to understand how to take care of their vehicle and when to take it in for maintenance.

For instance, if their tires are under inflated or don’t have enough tread, they could pop or slide on the road, creating a chain of events that could result in an accident. With that in mind, teach your teen how to check for symptoms of over-inflated tires and signs tires may need to be replaced, ensuring any new tires have an appropriate ply rating that measures strength and capacity.

As a parent, you also should discuss responsible driving behaviors and what to do in the case of an accident. While your teen may be reluctant to have these conversations, reinforce these conversations again and again. Because if they aren’t mature enough to talk about it, then they aren’t mature enough to get behind the wheel.

When All Else Fails, Reinforce the Rules Again and Again

Despite your best efforts and intentions, the information you share with your loved one may go in one ear and right out the other; after all, teens will be teens. Still, know that your teen is bound to make mistakes and/or circumvent your advice and rules while behind the wheel.

In these instances, it’s important to reinforce the rules you previously taught them or go back to the drawing board to implement new strategies. In the end, driving can be an inherently dangerous activity, which is why you need to do everything in your power to keep your teen — and everyone else on the road — safe.

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How Boosting Teen Confidence is as Easy as Changing a Tire

Posted by Sue Scheff on August 21, 2017  /   Posted in Parenting Teens, Teen Help

Building confidence in adolescents is key in raising healthy kids. But, of course, it’s not always easy. Research has shown that giving teens some form of responsibility can boost their self-confidence. Additionally, encouraging them to develop problem-solving skills — and resisting the urge to step in and help when things don’t go their way — can give teens an uptick in confidence, too.

Young people’s formative years are some of the most critical in developing good habits and decision-making. Here’s how you can foster more self-esteem in your teen and keep them out of trouble. Some might say it’s as easy as changing a tire.

Getting Started

While you may be reluctant to hand over the keys to your teen, you may also be surprised to know that not using your parental authority could potentially be damaging, as it can instill in your loved ones a sense that disobeying authority is OK. With that in mind, try not to unload all your worries on your teen, as expressing fear and frustration about everyday life, low test scores, unruly friends or dubious weekend plans can be negatively interpreted.

Instead, express to them some level of confidence. By doing this, your teen will remember that even though they experienced some struggles, they still had a vote of confidence from both parents. Of course, giving your child permission to drive is a big deal. So before you hand over the keys, set a curfew and a few other ground rules.

And while your teen may already have their driver’s license, it’s your responsibility to teach them about vehicle safety and mechanics. Teaching your teenager about the ins and outs of the car they’ll be driving promotes responsibility, and it will give them something to care about.

Changing a Flat Tire

Sure, you may changed a flat tire dozens of times, but it’s also important your teen learns on their own. Try not to be too overbearing or bossy, and only provide assistance when your teen asks for it. Instilling in them this sense of responsibility can foster greater self-esteem and achievement down the road.

Of course, one of the first things to teach your kid about replacing one or more tires is to let them know about which tell-tale signs to look for when experiencing a flat. Provide your teen with a list of steps to change a flat tire and then give them an opportunity to harness those skills.

Ultimately, both you and your teen can learn something from this activity. Parents, know that you’re nurturing growth in your teen with this challenge. And remember: A challenge can be just what your teen needs to avoid rebellion and boredom. It may be simple, but changing a flat tire provides many lessons, from problem solving to persistence, which can be valuable learning experiences for your teen. As a parent, recognize your teen’s willingness to try, and be supportive while attempting not to be too overbearing. In the end, this will help your teen build and better exude confidence.

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Protecting Your Teen Driving With Auto Insurance

Posted by Sue Scheff on July 07, 2017  /   Posted in Parenting Teens, Teen Help

Have you been living in dread of your teenager’s sixteenth birthday? It’s a much-anticipated or much-feared day, depending on whether you’re the teenager or the parent. Many teens await their sixteenth birthdays with anticipation, looking forward to hitting the road. That driver’s license is a rite of passage. But when your teen driver gets that license, there’s something else they’re going to need (well, apart from a car). And that’s insurance.

You might have heard that insurance rates are often higher for teens. That’s because teens often like to toe the line of risky behavior and they have little experience driving, which makes insurance even more important. We’ll tell you what you need to know about insuring a teen driver so that you can get them the coverage they need – without breaking the bank.

When you’re insuring your teen driver, keep these things in mind:

  1. Add your teenager to your auto policy.

Instead of taking out a brand new policy for your teen, add them to yours. This will help keep the rates under control, especially if you have a good driving record and drive a safe, reliable car. You’ll also want to make sure to note which car the teen will be driving – the vehicle does have an impact on the insurance rates. As you can imagine, a safe, solid minivan will cost less to insure than a sports car.

  1. Up your deductible.

If you’re able to, you can raise your deductible, which is the amount you pay out of pocket before your insurance will step in to cover the rest. This will, in turn, lower your premium. Think about how much money you can access as a deductible and choose an amount that’s right for you.

  1. Quest for discounts.

Does your kiddo have good grades? If you’re the proud parent of a student with a good GPA, your insurance company will likely reward you with a discount. “Good students” are seen as being less of a risk. See, hitting the books and studying hard comes in handy sometimes!

If you have a slightly older teen driver who’s headed off to college, you might be able to get a discount if they’re going to school more than 100 miles away and they’re not bringing a vehicle with them. They won’t have so much time behind the wheel, and that’s where the discount kicks in.

These are just a couple possible discounts. Be sure to ask your agent about any others you might qualify for.

  1. Choose the vehicle carefully.

The car that your teen drives has an impact on their insurance rates, which we mentioned above. It might be better to go with a safe, reliable used car than to get them a new, shiny car. Yes, they might beg and beg for a new car that’s all fancy and such, but a nice, semi-indestructible used car might be better for your wallet in more ways than one. If you already have a safe car that you feel comfortable with your teen driving, all the better! Do it. The car should ideally be more than five years old and have four doors. Whatever car you end up getting for your teen to drive, make sure that it’s in good shape.

Other practical information: Only name one car for your teen to drive and don’t let them drive any other vehicles. The rule should be that they can only drive the car that they’re insured for. Keep the car in your name rather than switching it over to that of your teen driver.

  1. Send them to driving school.

You might meet with some very loud and stubborn resistance, but it’s a good idea to send your teen to driving school. Preferably one that’s approved by your insurance company – check with your agent to see if they have any suggestions. By having your young charge complete a course in driver’s ed you might get a discount on their rates.

  1. Pay for minor damages yourself.

“I swear, Mom and Dad, I didn’t see the mailbox there…It’s just a scratch, really…”

If there’s a minor snafu with the car, take care of the repair yourself rather than claiming it on your insurance. Any claim can make your rates go up, plus there’s your deductible to consider. If it’s something you can handle on your own, do.

Of course, we hope that you’ll never have to pay for damages of any kind, but just in case something happens…

  1. Consider a PLUP.

A what? A Personal Liability Umbrella Policy. Since that’s a bit of a mouthful, we’ll just call it a PLUP.

A PLUP provides an extra layer of coverage over top of the insurance that you already have. Your auto policy has a certain limit on it, but if an accident causes damages that exceed that limit, you’re left on your own to cover the rest. That’s where the PLUP comes in. The PLUP will step in where the auto policy stopped, covering the damages up to its limit.

Insuring your teen driver is something that you know you have to do. You might not look forward to paying the higher premium for your auto insurance, but you’ll be able to breathe easier knowing that your teen has coverage.

If you want to talk more about insuring your teen, please don’t hesitate to give us a call. If you’d like to get a free quote for your auto insurance, fill out our quote form and you’ll be on your way!

Contributor: Katherine Betts

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How to Prepare Your Teen for Bad Weather Driving Conditions

Posted by Sue Scheff on January 18, 2017  /   Posted in Parenting Teens, Teen Help

Winter weather can make driving dangerous for even the most experienced drivers, so it’s no wonder, as a parent, you’re concerned about putting your teenager behind the wheel in less than ideal conditions. And there’s good reason for concern: Bad weather plays a role in 22 percent of total car crashes and at least 15 percent of crash fatalities. Safe winter driving is possible with preparation and practice.

If your teen has no experience navigating wintery roads, keep them off the road until you can give them some practice in a controlled environment, like an empty parking. Practice will help them get a feel for the car’s steering, gripping and braking on slick pavement so they will better understand how to adjust when they’re on the open road. In addition to hands-on driving experience, here are five ways to prepare your teen for winter driving.

1. Keep a Cold Weather Emergency Kit in the Car

Help your teen create an emergency kit that they can keep in the car. Items might include blankets, flashlight, flare, jumper cables, snacks and water, a small shovel, portable phone charger and hand warmers. Additionally, make sure they have the number to a roadside assistance service programmed into their phone.

2. Remove All Snow from the Car Before Driving

Teens in a hurry might be inclined to just scrape snow off the windows and get on the road. But that’s not guaranteed to safeguard them from visibility. Instead, encourage your teen to remove all snow on their vehicle’s exterior before driving. Headlights and taillights also need to be visible to other drivers and can play a crucial role when conditions take a turn for the worse. Furthermore, left behind snow on the hood and roof can fly off and hinder visibility for your teen and other drivers. Finally, have them check that the exhaust pipe is clear of snow to prevent carbon monoxide poisoning.

3. Perform a Thorough Maintenance Check

Routine maintenance becomes more important in poor weather. Have your teen check their fluids before driving, ensuring, in particular, that their windshield wiper fluid is topped off. Likewise, make sure the vehicle’s tires are properly inflated and in good condition. If the tread looks worn, consider replacing the tires altogether. Low tread or bald tires are especially dangerous on slick roads.

4. Ensure the Gas Tank is at least Half Full

Most teens will let their gas tanks run until they are completely empty, but stress the importance of a full tank when winter weather conditions are bad. That’s because there’s always the possibility of being caught in stopped traffic, or worse, getting stranded during bad weather. With that in mind, instruct your teen to always keep their gas tank above half in the winter.

5. Review Other Important Winter Driving Tips

  • Increase your following distance: When on the road, especially in icy conditions and during inclement weather, remind your teen to give cars in front of them more than enough space to allow for extra braking distance and skidding.
  • Decrease speed: Driving at slower-than-normal speeds may be necessary, because stopping, accelerating and turning all take longer in the snow. Also, keep in mind that other traffic will be moving slower than usual.
  • Watch for stopped vehicles: Be on the lookout for stranded cars, slow-moving snow plows and emergency vehicles.
  • Watch for ice on bridges: Bridges, shaded areas and overpasses will freeze before other parts of the road. Thus, these areas are more prone for accidents, so make sure to travel slowly through these areas.
  • Avoid using cruise control: It should be commonsense, but steer clear of using cruise control when the roads are wet to prevent sliding.
  • Keep your headlights on: Always keep your headlights on, even during the daytime, so other drivers can see you.

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Cellslip: The Gift of Saving Lives

Posted by Sue Scheff on December 07, 2016  /   Posted in Parenting Teens

pixabaytextingdrivingNo one needs to be reminded of the deadly statistics of distracted driving, especially as it pertains to teen drivers.  However let’s review some of them again from Distracted Driving Accidents:

  • 1 out of 4 car accidents in the US are caused by texting while driving.
  • Texting and driving is 6 times more likely to get you in an accident than drunk driving. That’s right, it is actually safer for someone to get wasted and get behind the wheel than to text and do it.
  • It takes an average of three seconds after a driver’s mind is taken off the road for any road accident to occur. This is the bare minimum amount of time it takes, and it is surprisingly small. Three seconds is the time it takes to turn your ignition when starting your car.
  • Every day, 11 teenagers die because they were texting while driving.
  • 94% of teenagers understand the consequences of texting and driving, but 35% of them admitted that they do it anyway.
  • Of all the teenagers ever involved in fatal accidents every year, 21% were using a cell phone at the time of the accident.
  • Teen drivers have a 400% higher chance of being in a car crash when texting while driving than adults.
  • 25% of teens respond to at least one text while driving, every single time.
  • 10% of adults and 20% of teenagers have admitted that they have entire conversations over text message platforms while driving.
  • 52% of these talk on the phone while driving, and 32% text on the road.
  • When teens text while they drive, they veer off lane 10% of their total drive time.

cellslip3Finally there is a perfect gift that can save lives, including your teenager’s life. Cellslip is an easy to use pocket that they can insert their phone into before they start driving. It blocks all incoming calls and text messages so they can concentrate on the road. When you remove the phone from the pocket, all your messages are received! They won’t miss a thing! No FOMO! (Fear of missing out).

It’s bright red to remind you of the dangers of distracted driving.

They have partnered with AAA, so this insures they are a quality product for you and your family’s safety.

This is a perfect holiday gift, not only for your teenager or young adult in your life, but for that hard to buy for person.  Have a holiday office party? Give them a Cellslip!

Cellslip also will promote businesses by personalizing pouches with your company logo’s.

Order your’s today – check out family pack!

Holiday special PROMO CODE: Use SlipItOrTicket and get 30% off your order!

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Teen-Involved Crash Deaths Spike 10 Percent

Posted by Sue Scheff on October 12, 2016  /   Posted in Parenting Teens

teendriverstatWhile the rate of teen driver-involved crashes has declined significantly over the last decade, there is still significant work to be done. A fresh look at 10 years of data from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS) shows the improvements in teen-involved fatal crash rates have not been as dramatic for older teens (ages 18-20) as compared to their younger counterparts (ages 15-17), and teen drivers are still 1.6 times more likely to be involved in a crash than adults. The report examines the differences in fatal crashes between older and younger teens, as well as by gender, and provides a set of 11 policy and best practice recommendations for states to implement.

What is the problem?

  • The analysis finds that teen drivers are still 1.6 times more likely to be involved in a fatal crash than their adult counterparts.
  • New data from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) show teen-involved fatal crashes spiked 10 percent in 2015, the first uptick since 2006.
  • According to GHSA’s new analysis, fatal crash rates for 18- to 20-year-old drivers have shown considerably less improvement over the past 10 years than for 15- to 17-year-old drivers.
  • Older teen drivers are involved in more fatal crashes than younger teens.
  • It is estimated that one in three teens is not licensed by age 18, which means that they do not benefit from graduated driver licensing (GDL) programs, which are proven to reduce crash risk by as much as 30 percent.

The report was funded through a grant from the Ford Motor Company Fund. The data analysis was conducted by Richard Retting of Sam Schwartz Transportation Consultants, and the report was researched and written by national teen driving expert Pam Fischer.

Read the full press release here.

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5 Common Driving Myths Young Motorists Swear are True

Posted by Sue Scheff on June 22, 2016  /   Posted in Parenting Teens

TeenDriver555If you want to know anything about driving, ask a new teen driver. While their overall enthusiasm and eagerness to get behind the wheel is heartfelt and genuine, many teens seem to possess a great deal of driving knowledge that’s not always accurate. With that in mind, check out the following commonly held beliefs about driving — and why they’re fiction instead of fact.

Keeping Your Wheels Shiny and Clean

A commonly held opinion among young drivers, notes Cars.com, is the importance of keeping the dashboard and wheels as shiny and clean as possible. The theory behind this myth is that using a protectant compound will protect the wheels and dashboard, keeping them in better shape for a longer period of time. Unfortunately, when it comes to the shiny dash, it can actually be unsafe; a slippery dash with a mirror-like finish will give off a major glare, which can reflect on the windshield and make it hard to see.

And while shiny, clean tires look nice, the best way to take care of them is through proper, regular maintenance. When it comes time to replace two or four tires, be sure to purchase new, name-brand tires from a reputable company, and always put the newer tires on the rear versus the front. This is true of front-, rear- or all-wheel-drive vehicles.

Red Cars Get the Most Speeding Tickets

Another commonly held belief by teen drivers, notes DriveTeam, is that owning a red car means you’re more likely to incur a speeding ticket. The theory behind this myth is that “arrest me red” vehicles more readily catch the eye of traffic cops.

In actuality, red cars are no more likely to get pulled over than any other colored vehicles. This may come as bad news to teens in black, blue or silver cars, but the best way to avoid getting pulled over is to obey the posted speed limit and be a safe, courteous driver.

Keep Your Hands at ’10 and 2′

Many parents of teen drivers were taught to pretend the steering wheel was like a big clock and to keep their hands at the “10 and 2” position. As Defensive Driving notes, this advice was more appropriate back in the day when fewer cars had airbags.

Now that most vehicles employ this important safety equipment, the “10 and 2” advice can be admonished, as the practice often leads to broken arms and other injuries during an accident. Teens who believe this myth most likely learned it from their folks, so gently advise them that current best practices call for keeping your hands at the “9 and 3” position.

Only Speeders Get in Accidents

Ah, if this was only the case. If it were true, our insurance rates would drop significantly, and we would all chug along at the speed limit, completely confident that we would never get in a wreck. Sadly, this myth is not true. Remind teens who are cavalier about speeding that driver error is the main cause of crashes — even when they’re traveling at 5 mph in a parking lot.

While it’s commendable teens are aware of the dangers of driving too fast, teach them that they must be vigilant at all times. This means paying close attention to their actions behind the wheel, as well as what other drivers, pedestrians and bicyclists are doing.

All New Drivers Get in Accidents

Hearing a new teen driver announce this myth will make any parent’s blood run cold. It’s almost as if they are daring the universe to make this untrue statement become reality. In actuality, there are plenty of young drivers who make it through their teen years without a single door ding, let alone a fender bender.

On the flip side, adult drivers who have perfect records could suddenly get rear ended in an intersection. Age is not the key here — other drivers’ bad actions and inattentiveness are much more likely to cause an accident.

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Summer Months: Higher Teen Death Rate

Posted by Sue Scheff on June 20, 2016  /   Posted in Parenting Teens, Teen Help

GuardrailIf you had to choose for your teen to drive through an icy winter storm or an 80-degree “not-a-cloud-in-the-sky” day, which would you prefer? If you’re like most, you’ll probably put your trust in the warm summer day as opposed to the blistery winter one.

Now, ask yourself the same question after reading the following statistic:

According to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS), the summer months of June, July, and August consistently have higher teenage crash deaths than any other month.

It would take a rare parent to send their teenager off for a drive during a winter storm without a few words of warning (if you were to even let them behind the wheel at all!) But do you allow yourself the same pause for reflection before your son hops in the car after summer practice to go to the beach with friends? Or when your daughter pulls out of the driveway on a warm July night to catch a movie?

Here’s to making summer 2015 the safest one yet. Some tips to help ensure your teen always comes back to you in one piece:

1. Buckle Up. Did you know? Compared to other age groups, teens have the lowest rate of seat belt use and the majority of teens involved in fatal crashes are unbelted. Set an example by always buckling up yourself — whether they’re in the car or not!

2. Limit passengers. I know, I know. Carpooling is all the rage and I’m all for protecting the environment, but make sure your teen knows there is a LIMIT to how many friends he or she may have in the car at any one time. Distracted driving is a real and all too serious thing, and the more friends in the car the more likely a distraction.

3. Speaking of distracted driving . . .think of investing in a nifty little product I happened upon recently called the Drop Stop. Drop Stop has made it their mission not only to catch all your small belongings that INEVITABLY fall in the gap between your seats, but to eliminate distracted driving in doing so. Your teen drops their phone, their jewelry, their credit card etc., while they’re driving. It falls between the gap. They look down, and down, and down, and… crash. With Drop Stop, they won’t have to look down, ever. If anything ever falls, they’ll know right where to find it, and it’ll be there safe and sound once they park.

4. Help your teen maintain their vehicle! Do they tires have enough tread? When was the last time they had an oil change? Does every light work and at what percentage are the breaks? Keep your teen safe by seeing to it these maintenance issues are up-to-date all while teaching your teen very adult responsibilities.

Summer inevitably means more teen drivers on the roads, many who have had minimal experience behind the road. Their lack of experience can lead to dubious decision making which can lead to every parent’s worst nightmare: A car collision.

What are some of your best tips for teen drivers, and parents of teen drivers? Share with me in the comments below, and remember: Drive safe this summer!

Takeaway tips:

• Discuss safe driving with your teen before they get a license.

• Be a role model. Don’t text and drive, even with your years of experience.

• Educate your teen. Sign them up for drivers-ed or online classes.

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Teen Driving Laws and Statistics You Need to Know

Posted by Sue Scheff on November 03, 2015  /   Posted in Parenting Teens, Struggling Teen Help, Teen Help, Troubled Teens

TeenDriving4There is nothing more indicative of growing up and blossoming into an adult like picturing your teenager at the wheel. You may be reeling from the bouts of anxiety you feel from knowing that your baby is no longer safely strapped away in her car seat, but rather behind the wheel. However alarming this may be, you can help prepare yourself for this inevitable transition from child to adulthood with some light preparation.

Become Aware of the Law

Knowing you have a teenager also means that your lovely, perfect angel is also probably experimenting, making risky choices and facing peer pressure at every turn. As reported by teendriversource.org, the fatal crash rate for drivers ages 16 to 19, based on miles driven, is four times higher than for drivers ages 25 to 69. As terrifying as this may be, you can prepare by becoming aware of driving laws in your state and getting your teen involved in learning the stats specific to your state. If you live in Florida, for example, you can visit driving-tests.org to learn all of the rules that matter and are tested in this state.

Prepare for the Worst

Knowing the law is the first step in helping your teen become a safe driver. The next step is recognizing that accidents do happen and that knowing how to handle such a situation is useful in making the best out of a bad situation. You can help your teen prepare by enrolling him in courses that can help him become more savvy about how to handle tough situations. Both Driver’s Ed and Defensive Driving are excellent courses that can help your teen become a safer driver. With a little research, you can find out what the age requirements are in your state. In Washington, you can attend a Driver’s Ed course as early as 15 years old, and in Montana you can be 14 when you enroll, proving that laws vary from state to state but what remains the same is the benefit of early education.

Practice Makes Perfect

If Driver’s Ed doesn’t cut it for you in terms of preparation, you can also choose to check out other programs designed to cover what it may not. One such program, Driver’s Edge, employs professionals to specifically target the unusually high number of teen accidents. While the founding office is based out of Las Vegas, this program travels across the country and educates parents and teens alike. You can check out their offerings at driversedge.org.

Be Understanding

Teenagers are looking to make their mark in the world and rules and regulations often appear as impositions on their independence. So don’t be surprised when from time to time, they do act out and in ways that make you cringe. You can, however, make clear that the car is not the place to challenge authority by sharing stories of other teens who made choices that resulted in fatal errors. According to health.harvard.edu, preventing driving accidents with teens can be as simple as setting the right limitations. So, instead of being concerned with where your teen is driving, consider how he is driving. By stressing the behaviors that good drivers exhibit, you can help your teen start to model these behaviors.

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    • Best and Worst Social Media Platforms October 8, 2019
      Instagram, Snapchat, Facebook, Twitter, TikTok and more. The CyberSmile Foundation released their Social America report. As many people are anxiously waiting to hear if the ‘like‘ button will be removed on both Facebook and Instagram, over 20,000 young people (both Gen Z and Millennials) were surveyed about their favorite (and not so favorite) social media […]
    • Nobody’s Victim: Fighting Psychos, Stalkers, Pervs and Trolls September 16, 2019
      Power Pervs, When Troll Armies Attack, A$$holes in Charge, Swipe Right for Stalking… are some of the chapter titles in this empowering and brilliantly written book, Nobody’s Victim by Carrie Goldberg. As a victim (and survivor) of internet defamation, cyberbullying and online shaming, I consider myself very fortunate. Nobody’s Victim outlines some of the darkest […]
    • Social Etiquette: Are You Google Ready? September 7, 2019
      Your online reputation can determine your future There’s no denying it, there will be a time when your name is put through a Google rinse cycle. Someone will be searching you on the internet. Here are some facts that survey’s have uncovered: 70 percent of employers use social media to screen potential job candidates before […]

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