^ Back to Top
954-260-0805

Teen drug addiction

Helping Your Child with Addiction

Posted by Sue Scheff on May 05, 2016  /   Posted in Parenting Teens, Residential Therapy, Struggling Teen Help, Teen Help, Troubled Teens

By Matt Gonzalez

Teen Drug Abuse

Teens today grapple with a variety of problems. In response, many of them turn to drugs as their outlet.

Teen drug use has spiked in recent years. Per the National Institute on Drug Abuse:

  • In 2014, more than 27 percent of high school students used illicit drugs
  • More than 36 percent of 12th-graders reported using marijuana, nearly six percent of whom reported daily marijuana use
  • Nearly 44 percent of 12th-graders reported drinking alcohol in the past month
  • Nearly 5 percent of high school seniors reported using Vicodin, a prescription painkiller

Drug use can be especially problematic for young people. Substance abuse can stunt their brain development and lead to academic problems, drug dependence or serious health ailments.

A number of factors lead to teen drug abuse. They may have a family history of substance abuse, which increases the likelihood he or she picks up an addiction. They may have been socially rejected. They may be suffering from depression or low self-esteem.

ParentTeenChatWhatever the reason, teens who use drugs or alcohol need assistance. Much of this support comes from parents.

Ways to Help

Talking to your teen about drugs is an important step for any parent. When doing so, be sure to consider the following:

Find a Quiet Setting

The conversation should take place in a comfortable environment, with as few distractions as possible. This limits interruptions, which will helps your teen focus.

Listen to Your Child

Listen carefully to what your child has to say and encourage honesty. Watch their body language as they talk about certain subjects and avoid lecturing.

Ask Them About Media Messages

Media outlets glamorize and promote substance abuse. Talk to your child about these messages and find out if he or she is influenced by them. This could help you create a set of rules or guidelines for your home.

Discuss Peer Pressure and the Benefits of Saying No

If your teen is influenced by peer pressure, brainstorm with them ways to say “no.” There are a variety of reasons not to do drugs. Talk to your teen about these benefits without using scare tactics.

Other Strategies to Consider

Kids are human. They have their own personalities and likes and dislikes. Treat your child like an individual, but be clear that you are the parent and you are in charge.

Establish Rules

Lay down ground rules, such as a curfew or places to avoid. Your child may not like these new rules, but they may prevent him or her from engaging in substance abuse.

Keep an Eye on Your Child

Is your child acting differently? Are they irritable? Do they have trouble concentrating? Monitor whether they exhibit any signs of drug use and take action when needed.

Know Their Friends

If their friends use drugs, your teen may fall into the same bad habits. Monitor who they hang out with and their behaviors around these friends.

Provide Support

Offering praise or encouragement can help establish a strong relationship between you and your teen. This communication could boost their self-esteem and prevent them from substance abuse.

Set an Example

Children learn a lot from their parents’ actions. Set an example by avoiding drug use yourself. The less they are around drugs or alcohol, the less likely they are to use.

Treatment Options

Treatment is essential for teens with addictions. Luckily, there are a number of rehabilitation centers, some of which cater specifically to teens.

Parents constantly worry about their children. If drugs enter the equation, this anxiety increases. It is important to have an open dialogue with your child about drugs, especially if you suspect they are using illicit substances.

Open communication and support could prevent them from fighting a lifelong battle.

Bio: Matt Gonzales is a writer and researcher for DrugRehab.com. He boasts several years of experience writing for a daily publication, multiple weekly journals, a quarterly magazine and various online platforms. He has a bachelor’s degree in communication, with a Journalism concentration, from East Carolina University.

Sources:

National Institute on Drug Abuse. (2014, December). DrugFacts: High School and Youth Trends. Retrieved from https://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/drugfacts/high-school-youth-trends

Mayo Clinic. (2016, February 2). Teen drug abuse: Help your teen avoid drugs. Retrieved from http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/tween-and-teen-health/in-depth/teen-drug-abuse/art-20045921

*************

If you have exhausted local resources for your troubled teen, please contact us for information about residential therapy.

Tags: ,,,,

Risky Use of Stimulants and Teenagers

Posted by Sue Scheff on February 10, 2016  /   Posted in Parenting Teens, Residential Therapy, Struggling Teen Help, Teen Help, Troubled Teens

TeensADHDMedsBy Constance Scharff, PhD

Prescription ADHD medications like Adderall, Ritalin, and Vyvanse are becoming increasingly popular for overworked and overscheduled college students. ADHD stimulants strengthen the brain’s inhibitory capacities, by increasing the amount of certain neurotransmitters, like dopamine, epinephrine, and norepinephrine. Students like these drugs because they enhance their study efforts.

Prescription “study drugs” are commonly abused to increase concentration for last minute cramming or paper writing. The numbers vary significantly by school, with the greatest proportion of users at private and “elite” universities. Some researchers estimate about 30% of university students use stimulants non-medically.

Students believe that they take these stimulants for the “right reasons,” to be more productive in classes and to stay afloat in a flood of intense competition. In the competitive atmosphere at many schools, students seldom take the time to consider short or long-term risks of taking these drugs, nor understand how certain stimulants may interact with other drugs.

Sean McCabe, research associate professor at the University of Michigan Substance Abuse Research Center said:

“Our biggest concern is the increase we have observed in this behavior over the past decade. College students tend to underestimate the potential harms associated with the nonmedical use of prescription stimulants.”

While students’ knowledge of the health dangers are limited, even less consideration is given to the illegality of use. Obtaining stimulants from friends with prescriptions, as the vast majority of college students do, seems less dangerous and illegal than buying drugs off the street. Yet these drugs are illegal if used other than intended or by someone other than the person to whom they are prescribed. These drugs are Schedule II substances, on the Drug Enforcement Administration’s list right next to cocaine and morphine.

Colleges and universities need to increase awareness about the abuse of these drugs and prompt broader discussion about misuse of medications like Ritalin or Adderall for study purposes. Prevention education for all students may help inform many that these drugs are highly addictive and can have serious side effects. A medical professional or counselor can provide help and support if a student you know is abusing these drugs, along with more information if needed.

BookEndingAddictionAbout the author: Constance Scharff has a Ph.D. in Transformative Studies, specializing in addiction recovery. She is the Senior Addiction Research Fellow and Director of Addiction Research at Cliffside Malibu Treatment Center, and co-author of Ending Addiction for Good with Richard Taite.

 

If your teen is struggling with drug use, please don’t hesitate to get help immediately. If you have exhausted your local resources please contact us for options on residential treatment.

Tags: ,,,,,,

Addiction and Overdose Awareness

Posted by Sue Scheff on August 31, 2015  /   Posted in Parenting Teens, Residential Therapy, Struggling Teen Help, Teen Help, Uncategorized

InternalOverdoseAugust 31 each year is International National Overdose Awareness Day.

The theme for 2015 is Rethink and Remember.

If you are a parent of a teen that you believe is experimenting with drugs or alcohol, maybe you think it is only marijuana or just a few beers — but statistics have shown we are living in a new generation that today’s substances can be more dangerous and addictive than generations prior.

The other concern is prescription medications.  We have more children today diagnosed with ADD/ADHD, whereas in earlier years they were labeled troubled or simply hyper – today we have a diagnosis for them.  With that comes medication that can help them.  The problem is when teenagers want to abuse their prescription medications.

HeronAbuse

 

Studies have revealed that from prescription medication as well as some drug dealers lacing marijuana with heroin, some of our youth are getting hooked on heroin at early ages.  This is not only dangerous – it’s deadly.

What is drug addiction?

Addiction is a chronic, often relapsing brain disease that causes compulsive drug seeking and use, despite harmful consequences to the addicted individual and to those around him or her. Although the initial decision to take drugs is voluntary for most people, the brain changes that occur over time challenge an addicted person’s self-control and hamper his or her ability to resist intense impulses to take drugs. – NIDA

NIDATeensGet the facts on different drugs teens are using and abusing today.  Visit NIDA for Teens. Being an educated parent, you will have healthier and safer teens.  You must keep your lines of communication open, and continue to discuss the risks of these substances with them.  Share this site with them too.

As difficult as drug addiction is for a parent to accept, it is ten times harder to lose a loved one — especially a child or teenager.

Don’t be a parent in denial. 

If you suspect your teen is using drugs, abusing their prescription drugs, cough syrup medicine included, reach out for help.

If you have exhausted your local resources and feel you aren’t able to help your teen at home, please contact us for more resources and options.  Overdose Awareness Day, make it your day to learn more about what your teen is doing.

Faces of the new addicts, a ABC NEWS 20/20 Special.


Overdose Awareness 30 Second Ad:

Tags: ,,,

As Featured On

DrPhil_Season_7_title_card1-250x139oprah-logo-250x1091PLATFORMforgoodParentingTodaysKidssunsentinelGaltimeFoxNews1Forbes-Magazine-Logo-Fonthuffington-post-logo
family online safetyTodayMomsusatodaywashpostabcnewsCNN-living1anderson-cooper-360-logo-250x107cbs_eve_logobostonglobe-250x250nbc6newsweek

..and many more.

  • Facebook

    This message is only visible to admins.

    Problem displaying Facebook posts.
    Click to show error

    Error: An access token is required to request this resource.
    Type: OAuthException
  • Follow @SueScheff

  • RSS Sue Scheff Blog

    • Teen Internet Addiction March 28, 2020
      Internet addiction, is it real? YES! Today we are facing a time when teen depression is on the rise. Young people are struggling with anxiety, stress and overwhelmed by peer pressure. They are completely immersed in their screens without considering their emotional or physical health. Warning signs -An obsession with being online-Frustration, anxiety, and irritability […]
    • Social Shaming Should Not Be Part of Social Distancing March 18, 2020
      Social distancing shouldn’t be cruel. We are living in an extremely stressful and unusual times with the corona virus outbreak (COVID-19). With the majority of schools, restaurants, bars, retail stores, small businesses, etc…. closing – this means people are not only facing financial hardships, the emotional well-being of individuals is at risk too. Unfortunately we’re […]
    • Nice It Forward: Random Acts of Kindness February 17, 2020
      National Random Acts of Kindness Day is February 17th but do we need a day to remind us to be nice to each other? Being kind starts with us and should be everyday. Random Acts of Kindness Day is great time to emphasize the importance of humanity towards each other. At the same time, it’s […]

To get help, CLICK HERE or call us at 954-260-0805
P.U.R.E. does not provide legal advice and does not have an attorney on staff.
^ Back to Top
Copyright © 2001-2020 Help Your Teens. Optimized Web Design by SEO Web Mechanics Site Map