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Teen Drug Use

Synthetic Drugs: What Parents Need to Know

Posted by Sue Scheff on February 22, 2016  /   Posted in Parenting Teens, Residential Therapy, Struggling Teen Help

One small dose. That’s all it was.  She was an honor roll student, not into drugs, never in troubled or into partying. Tara Fitzgerald, only 17 years old, however, was curious to try LSD and on one night made one bad decision she never woke up from.

“We all feel immune to drugs because our kids are better than that – they know better, they’re going to be smarter and it’s not going to happen to us. Well, it can happen to anybody,” – said Tara’s father in the following video.

What is synthetic drugs?

Synthetic drugs are created using man-made chemicals rather than natural ingredients.

A number of synthetic drugs on the market, including Ecstasy, LSD and methamphetamine, are described in other booklets in The Truth About Drugs series. This booklet gives the facts about “synthetic marijuana” (Spice or K2), “synthetic stimulants” (Bath Salts) and a drug known as “N-bomb.” These are among the synthetic drugs known as “designer drugs.”

Source: Drug-Free World

ParentsTalkingTeensWhat can parents do?

Communication is key.

If you watch the entire segment of Dateline, you will discover that although parents want to be able to trust their teenagers, it doesn’t mean you stop checking in on them — assuming they are a good kid, and nothing is going on.

Tara’s parents would give anything to go back to that night and check in on her – rather than assume she’s a good kid – all is just fine.

Even good kids make bad choices, don’t be that parent in denial. Don’t end up being a statistic. Worse – don’t end up being a headline.

If you’re struggling with your teen and have exhausted your local resources, sometimes residential therapy can be your next step. Contact us for quality resources.

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Teens and Drug Use: Beyond Addiction

Posted by Sue Scheff on January 27, 2016  /   Posted in Parenting Teens, Residential Therapy, Struggling Teen Help, Teen Help, Troubled Teens, Uncategorized

Ranking the riskiest drugs in the United States, beyond addiction.

It’s time to rethink your ideas about the most dangerous drugs. Many are in our own homes.

Of course, this doesn’t mean that everyone is going to be abusing them, however when you have a teenager desperate to get high, you must consider all these options.

Don’t be a parent in denial — be an educated parent. You will have a safer and healthier family.

31 Most Harmful Drugs

 

All Psychology Schools

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Teens Ordering Drugs Online: Don’t Be A Parent In Denial

Posted by Sue Scheff on January 24, 2016  /   Posted in Digital Parenting, Internet Safety, Residential Therapy, Struggling Teen Help, Teen Help, Troubled Teens

onlinepharmacyThe Internet is today’s new playground for today’s youth. From Club Penguin to Instagram to Snapchat to our teen’s looking for more ways to have excitement offline.

Prescription drug use isn’t just in your medicine cabinet or street drugs…. teens are ordering drugs online.

Researchers from Columbia University spent five years searching the Internet for websites that advertise and sell prescription drugs. They found 365. Eighty-five percent of them did not require a doctor’s prescription or proof of age, even though people were buying powerful narcotics. (CRC Health)

Psychology Today reported that kids as young as sixth graders were ordering drugs online.

What can parents do to help prevent this behavior?

  • Talk to your kids. Explain what’s wrong with buying medications illegally, in terms they can understand. Tell them in no uncertain terms that you strictly forbid them to buy drugs on the Internet. Be specific about the consequences (your choice here), and make it clear that disciplinary actions will be enforced on the very first violation.
  •  If you suspect or find out that option 1 isn’t working, move the computer out of the kids’ bedrooms and into common spaces (living room, kitchen, etc.). Tell them that the computer will remain in a common area for a set period of time, so that you can monitor their Web use.
  • If options 1 and 2 aren’t working, check the computer’s browser history. Yes, this is spying. But if you believe your child is really involved in an illegal activity, you have an obligation to investigate.  (Keep in mind, safety trumps privacy. This is about your child’s welfare). This shouldn’t be used because you are simply snooping for no reason – you are rising losing your child’s trust.

(Source – Psychology Today)

If you find that you have exhausted your local resources, including therapy, or your teen is simply out-of-control, you may want to consider residential therapy. Contact us for a free consultation to determine if this is an option for your family.

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Everyday More Than 4000 Teens Try Drugs for the First Time

Posted by Sue Scheff on January 06, 2016  /   Posted in Parenting Teens, Residential Therapy, Struggling Teen Help, Teen Help, Troubled Teens

parents you matterThis is a sobering fact that parents need to stop being in denial about.

We have good kids making bad decisions.

Parents Matter:

  • 1 in 4 kids who have tried alcohol had their first drink at age 12 or younger
  • Every day, more than 4,000 teenagers try an illicit drug for the first time
  • Kids who learn about the risks of substance abuse at home are significantly less likely to use. Parents and other caring adults do matter and can make a difference.

These statistics are why it’s imperative you build a relationship of trust and open your lines of communication with your child and especially a teenager. We know it’s not easy, however it’s necessary.

In today’s fast-paced society, parents may have to schedule time with their teens – don’t skip those family meals, make it a priority. If not every night, at least several times a week. Studies have proven that having meals together can reduce risky behavior in adolescences.

If you suspect your teen is using drugs and your conversations have gone on deaf ears, turn to local counseling. If you are still struggling, please contact us for information on residential therapy.

Source: Parents360

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Preventing Underage Drinking During the Holidays

Posted by Sue Scheff on December 03, 2015  /   Posted in Parenting Teens, Residential Therapy, Struggling Teen Help, Teen Help, Troubled Teens

Teens are not any different than adults and parents, they want to celebrate the holidays and be festive!

What is different is alcohol shouldn’t be included in their recipe of fun.

Let’s face it, we were all kids once, and during this time especially, relatives would have us try drinks during home parties – but what parents are facing today can be more serious than generations earlier.

Here some tips for discussing the holiday alcohol chat with your teens:

Do your research: Learn the facts of the affects of alcohol and how it can affect their health and mind. That way, you can successfully communicate the right information to your kids. Have the talk early with your kids before the parties and peer pressure start, and talk about it often. We know so much more today than we did generations earlier.

Reduce peer pressure: Teach your teens that they should celebrate the holidays with friends they can trust and that have share similar interests and values with. By doing this, kids can minimize the effects of peer pressure and they won’t feel uncomfortable at parties.

Have the right timing: There are many great ways to give an excuse to have the talk; talk to your teens when they enter high school, when they’re going to their first party, or when a teen alcohol-related event appears on the news.

Listen and pay attention: It’s important to listen and not lecture. Ask their opinions and suggestions. Pay attention to what kids are doing during the holidays, who they are hanging out with, and if their behavior changes, find out why.  Keep in mind – it’s best to have your conversation before a confrontation arises.

Have a safe word: Doing this will give your kids the chance to call or text you if they are uncomfortable with what’s going on at a party and they won’t feel embarrassed.

Have others involved in the conversation: Have older siblings involved in the conversation, a family friend, a teacher or coach involved since these are all trusted people.

This information is courtesy of The Alcohol Talk.  Also for more information on underage drinking, please visit the non-profit organization Foundation for Advancing Alcohol Responsibility at: www.responsibility.org.

Is your teen out-of-control and you have exhausted all your local resources including therapy and out patience services? Are you considering residential treatment? Learn more about it and if it is right for your individual teen and your family. Contact us today for a free consultation.

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Warning Signs Your Teen Could Be Using Drugs

Posted by Sue Scheff on November 23, 2015  /   Posted in Parenting Teens, Residential Therapy, Struggling Teen Help, Teen Help, Troubled Teens

TeendrugabuseThis is a difficult question that many parents have to face on a daily basis. Parents who spend a great deal of time with their teenagers are often tuned into what is normal behavior and what is not.

However, even parents who are actively involved in the daily activities of their teenagers may overlook – or subconsciously deny – the earliest signs of a substance abuse problem.

Some of the clues that your teenager may exhibit when using drugs or alcohol are fairly subtle, but others are rather obvious:

• Many hours spent alone, especially in their room; persistent isolation from the rest of the family. This is particular suspicious in a youngster who had not been a loner until now.

• Resistance to taking with or confiding in parents, secretiveness, especially in a teenager who had previously been open. Be sure that your teenager is not being secretive because every time he tries to confide in you, you jump on him or break his confidence.

• There is marked change for the worse in performance and attendance at school and/or job or other responsibilities as well as in dress, hygiene, grooming, frequent memory lapses, lack of concentration, and unusual sleepiness.

• A change of friends; from acceptable to unacceptable.

• Pronounced mood swings with irritability, hostile outbursts, and rebelliousness. Your teenager may seem untrustworthy, insincere or even paranoid.

• Lying , usually in order to cover up drinking or drug using behavior as well as sources of money and possessions; stealing, shoplifting, or encounters with the police.

• Abandonment of wholesome activities such as sports, social service and other groups, religious services, teen programs, hobbies, and even involvement in family life.

• Unusual physical symptoms such as dilated or pinpoint pupils, bloodshot eyes, frequent nosebleeds, changes in appetite, digestive problems, excessive yawning, and the shakes.

Parent_Teen_TroublesThese are just a few of the warning signs that can be recognized.

• Be careful not to jump to the conclusion that your teenager may be using when you see such behavior.
• Evaluate the situation.
• Talk to your teenager.
• Try to spend time with her so that she feels that she can trust you.
• By creating a home that is nurturing, she will understand that despite of unhealthy choices that she will always get the love and moral support that she deserves.
• Building a strong relationship with your teenager now will mean that in time of crises your love, support, wisdom, and experience won’t be shut out of your teenager’s decision making.
• If you have a suspicion that your teenager is involved in the use of drugs or alcohol, don’t hesitate to bring the subject up.

The sooner the problem is identified and treated, the better the chances that your teenager’s future will be safeguarded. Raising the subject will be easier if you already have good communication in the family. Discuss the ways in which you can seek help together. An evaluation by a substance abuse professional may be the key to understanding what is really going on with your teenager.

Contributor: Shawnda Burns, LCSW

Especially around the holiday season, keep your parent radar on high alert. Monitor your monitor medicine cabinets.

If your teen has been struggling with substance abuse, be sure to seek help. If they refuse to get help, it may be time to consider residential therapy. Contact us for more information on this step.

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Addiction and Overdose Awareness

Posted by Sue Scheff on August 31, 2015  /   Posted in Parenting Teens, Residential Therapy, Struggling Teen Help, Teen Help, Uncategorized

InternalOverdoseAugust 31 each year is International National Overdose Awareness Day.

The theme for 2015 is Rethink and Remember.

If you are a parent of a teen that you believe is experimenting with drugs or alcohol, maybe you think it is only marijuana or just a few beers — but statistics have shown we are living in a new generation that today’s substances can be more dangerous and addictive than generations prior.

The other concern is prescription medications.  We have more children today diagnosed with ADD/ADHD, whereas in earlier years they were labeled troubled or simply hyper – today we have a diagnosis for them.  With that comes medication that can help them.  The problem is when teenagers want to abuse their prescription medications.

HeronAbuse

 

Studies have revealed that from prescription medication as well as some drug dealers lacing marijuana with heroin, some of our youth are getting hooked on heroin at early ages.  This is not only dangerous – it’s deadly.

What is drug addiction?

Addiction is a chronic, often relapsing brain disease that causes compulsive drug seeking and use, despite harmful consequences to the addicted individual and to those around him or her. Although the initial decision to take drugs is voluntary for most people, the brain changes that occur over time challenge an addicted person’s self-control and hamper his or her ability to resist intense impulses to take drugs. – NIDA

NIDATeensGet the facts on different drugs teens are using and abusing today.  Visit NIDA for Teens. Being an educated parent, you will have healthier and safer teens.  You must keep your lines of communication open, and continue to discuss the risks of these substances with them.  Share this site with them too.

As difficult as drug addiction is for a parent to accept, it is ten times harder to lose a loved one — especially a child or teenager.

Don’t be a parent in denial. 

If you suspect your teen is using drugs, abusing their prescription drugs, cough syrup medicine included, reach out for help.

If you have exhausted your local resources and feel you aren’t able to help your teen at home, please contact us for more resources and options.  Overdose Awareness Day, make it your day to learn more about what your teen is doing.

Faces of the new addicts, a ABC NEWS 20/20 Special.


Overdose Awareness 30 Second Ad:

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Marijuana, Pills to Heroin: Teen Drug Use

Posted by Sue Scheff on August 04, 2015  /   Posted in Parenting Teens, Struggling Teen Help, Teen Help, Troubled Teens

heroinfoilNo parent wants to believe their teenager will escalate from smoking a joint to pill popping to literally shooting or digesting heroin – but sadly this trend is growing.

Why?  Because heroin has become a cheap drug for youth to purchase and some drug dealers are conveniently lacing marijuana with heroin to quickly get your teen addicted.

Why is heroin so dangerous?

Heroin is considered to be the most highly addictive substance known to man. 

Heroin Facts from NIDA for Teens:

Heroin is a type of opioid drug that is partly man-made and partly natural. It is made from morphine, a psychoactive (mind-altering) substance that occurs naturally in the resin of the opium poppy plant. Heroin’s color and look depend on how it is made and what else it may be mixed with. It can be white or brown powder or a black, sticky substance called “black tar heroin.”

Heroin is becoming an increasing concern in areas where lots of people abuse prescription opioid painkillers, like OxyContin and Vicodin. They may turn to heroin since it produces a similar high but is cheaper and easier to obtain. Nearly half of young people who inject heroin surveyed in recent studies reported abusing prescription opioids before starting to use heroin.

To learn more about the different types of opioids, visit  Opioids Drug Facts page.

HeroinSlangSlang terms teens use for heroin:

“Smack,” “Junk,” “H,” “Black tar,” “Ska,” and “Horse”

Be an educated parent, you will have healthier and safer teens.

Being a parent in denial doesn’t help anyone.

If you suspect your teen is using heroin, get help immediately.  Residential therapy is nothing to be ashamed of.  Contact us for more information.

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