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Teen Help

Will My Teen Hate Me If I Send Them for Teen Help

Posted by Sue Scheff on September 03, 2021  /   Posted in Teen Help

The Fear of Your Teen Hating You for Sending them Away

Are you afraid your teen will hate you if you send them for teen help?

Help Your Teens BigBoySad-300x224 Will My Teen Hate Me If I Send Them for Teen Help Your teen will likely be scared of the new situation and may also promise to “do better at home” if you’ve discussed the possibility of going to a therapeutic boarding school or residential treatment center.

We never recommend parents threaten their child with this option, since choosing residential therapy is such an amazing opportunity for your teen to develop coping skills they may be lacking, improve self-esteem to make better choices, learn anger and stress management skills and most of all – improve their overall mental wellness.

Most of these programs’ strengths are targeted at emotional growth and wellness – academics are typically secondary, but are important. Keep in mind, without emotional wellness – nothing will work in life.

In our experience, your child will likely grow from fear and anger they already have — to love and understanding that this decision was made with their best interests in mind.

We are parents, too, and we know this is a tough decision, but it is one of the most loving decisions you can make for your teen’s future.

The majority of parents have to employ a transport service to safely get their teen to a program. Although this can seem deceptive, again, you will be pleasantly surprised that your teen will not hate you.

We encourage you to talk to other parents and teens that have used these services to better understand how they work. Don’t rely on the internet and some stories that are geared towards fearmongering. Be smart, hire licensed and insured teams, talk to references and get your child the help they need.

This is a major financial and emotional decision, it’s going to impact your teen on so many levels in their long-term life. It’s why since 2001 we’ve been educating parents about the teen help industry and finding the best fit for your individual needs.

Contact us for more information.

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Does My Teen Smoking Pot Need Teen Help

Posted by Sue Scheff on September 03, 2021  /   Posted in Mental Health, Teen Help

When Good Teens Decide Pot is “Good” for Them

Is your good teen now smoking pot?

Help Your Teens BigstockTeenDrugUse-300x199 Does My Teen Smoking Pot Need Teen Help We are regularly contacted by parents when they hit their wit’s end — not only because of behavioral issues of their teenager, but they find out they have been smoking pot (marijuana).

Whether it’s on a regular basis or for recreational purposes, the fact is, since marijuana has become legal in some states, many teens assume this means it’s a safe drug for them too.

Some parents are confused to how serious it can be. Not only for their health, but it’s having ramifications on their future too.

Is your teen being scouted for an athletic scholarship? Or are they considered for an academic one? Maybe applying for a job where drug testing is done.

Today the majority of colleges that are handing out scholarships are hiring third parties to monitor up to 4 years of social media background on their potential student. How will your teen stand-up to a Google rinse cycle?

Are there any images or content of them at parties with substances? Remember, it’s not only about your GPA or athletic ability anymore — it’s about your online reputation. It’s equal to your offline character.

If you find your teen is actively using marijuana, you have won half the battle because you know what’s going on. This is a great benefit as many parents are in the dark. But what are the next steps to immediately take?

The Partnership for Drug-Free Kids advises that the following actions can help:

  • Be clear that drug use will not be tolerated, and set the terms of any ramifications to follow, such as grounding or earlier curfew. It is critical to then implement any such repercussions, in order to underline the severity of the situation.
  • Provide opportunities to re-establish the bond of trust, such as supervising homework and chores but also recognizing a job well done.
  • Be responsive to the child’s efforts to correct the behavior, as a punishing attitude alone can jeopardize or damage the emotional bond between parent and child.
  • If a friend is involved, consider contacting the parents. First, it will send a message that drug use will not be tolerated. Second, it can help the other parents to take measures to prevent their children’s drug abuse. Third, it creates a dialogue around drug use between concerned parents.

The following are some ways parents can determine if their child is using marijuana:

  • Understand and watch out for the physical and psychological signs of marijuana use, which includes side effects of use, severe reactions/side effects of marijuana toxicity, and withdrawal symptoms.
  • Learn about the behavioral signs associated with substance abuse.
  • Consider searching for potential hiding places for marijuana and related paraphernalia.

The physical and psychological signs of marijuana use are the same as the side effects the user will experience. Most often, these effects are temporary and may only last up to a few hours. For this reason, parents may not have an opportunity to notice the physical side effects of marijuana use when children use marijuana away from home.

Some children may use marijuana at home or return home before the effects have fully worn away.

It is important to know the physical side effects, which range in severity, but can include:

  • Red eyes
  • Increased blood pressure
  • Forgetfulness
  • Dizziness and headaches
  • Laughter without a reason
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Panic or anxiety
  • Hallucinations

We’re not condoning teen’s smoking pot, but we also recognize that sadly it’s becoming a new normal. Parents need to intervene before it escalates. This is not your generation’s marijuana.

If you’ve exhausted your local resources for help, such as therapy and other avenues, it may be time for residential therapy.

It’s important to find the right school or program for your teen. Not a program that populates an element of addicts or hard-core gang members. It’s likely your son or daughter is a good kid starting to make some bad choices — probably trying to fit in or struggling with other emotional issues that’s driving them to escape their feelings. It’s important to determine why.

Don’t get sucked into the programs that are punitive or primitive. We believe in finding the right fit for your individual needs. Building them up to make good choices.

Contact us today for more information. It’s about educating parents to make the best choice for your family.

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Does My Teen Have a Gaming Addiction

Posted by Sue Scheff on September 03, 2021  /   Posted in Teen Help

Getting Teen Help for Gaming Addiction

Many parents are concerned with the amount of time their tweens and teens spend online.

Whether it’s communicating with friends through social media, texting or chatting — or they are playing video games, it all involves screen-time.

What is game internet addiction?

Help Your Teens PixabayInternetGaming-300x200 Does My Teen Have a Gaming Addiction Experts say that just because someone uses the internet a lot, or even obsessively, doesn’t mean they’re addicted.

The key signal of internet use disorder — more commonly called internet addiction — is if the uncontrolled use of the internet for gaming, gambling, pornography, social media or blogging starts to interfere with the teen’s daily, real-world life.

At this point, internet use becomes a problem because it may affect teens’ physical health and social skills. Most importantly, it may aggravate any underlying mental health conditions, such as depression or anxiety, which are sometimes the major contributing factors to why teens develop internet addiction.

It has been extremely challenging times for both parents and teens. With the increase of digital addiction, we have seen a shift in behavioral changes with young people such as:

  • Defiance
  • Rage
  • Anger
  • Withdrawn
  • Failing in school

Especially if parents remove or threaten to take their devices away from the teen, the behavior escalates. Their online life is oxygen them.

It’s more beneficial to help them learn healthier digital habits and healthy relationship with their devices.

Signs of internet addiction in teens:

  • A need to be on the internet that is more important than being with friends or engaging in other hobbies.
  • A dip in grades for no other reason other than the desire to spend time on the internet, which prevents concentration on schoolwork.
  • Anxiety when away from the internet.
  • Ignoring school work, chores at home and personal hygiene in order to maximize time spent on the internet.
  • Fatigue from staying up late or getting up early to be on the internet.
  • Irritability, anger or emotional outbursts when questioned about the time spent online.

Treating internet addiction

Help Your Teens BigstockMomTeenonCell-300x199 Does My Teen Have a Gaming Addiction Have you tried home contracts, even bargained with your teen in order to limit screen time and nothing worked?

It might be time to consider a more extensive digital detox plan so your teens can develop a healthy relationship with technology.

The fact is — the internet is not going away. It’s imperative they learn coping skills to be productive and emotionally secure with their social media. There are too many young people living for likes and followers. Many teens actually base their self-worth on the number of likes or followers they have acquired. Sadly, this is now the world they live in.

Some of the more common psychological treatments of Internet Addiction Disorder include:

  • Individual, group, or family therapy
  • Behavior modification
  • Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT)
  • Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT)
  • Equine Therapy
  • Art Therapy
  • Recreation Therapy

Have you exhausted your local resources? Is your teen struggling with their obsession with their device? Is their physical and mental health suffering? It might be time to consider residential therapy.

Contact us for more information.

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How to Help My Disrespectful Teen

Posted by Sue Scheff on September 03, 2021  /   Posted in Teen Help

Will Teen Help Programs Help Disrespectful Teenagers?

Eye rolling, curses, insults, backtalk, name-calling, ignored requests, snide comments: disrespect from your teen comes in many different forms.

If you’re dealing with a defiant, rebellious and disrespectful teenager, you’re not alone. This is one of the most common complaints we hear from parents today. Today’s teen has zero respect for authority – it’s not like generation’s earlier. When our parents told us to come home at 10pm, there was never a question – we were actually home ten minutes earlier!

Help Your Teens bigstock-Upset-Mom-And-Daughter-29710640-300x200 How to Help My Disrespectful Teen Backtalk? We wouldn’t dream of it, unless we enjoyed the taste of soap – or a good whipping! Yes, I said it.

I’m not saying any of us were abused, I’m only saying our parents were allowed to discipline us – and we learned respect very early in our tween-age life.

Not so much today. We’re living in an entitlement generation.

Disrespectful or rude behavior in teenagers is something many parents face at some point.

About disrespectful and defiant behavior in teenagers

Sometimes you might feel that interactions with your child all seem a bit like this:

  • You – ‘How’s that project going?’
  • Your child – ‘Why are you checking up on me? Don’t you trust me? I always get good marks, so why ask me about it?’
  • You – ‘I was only asking. I just wanted to know if you’re going OK with it …’
  • Your child – ‘Sure you were … mumble, mumble, mumble.’

As a parent, you might feel hurt, worried and unsure about what’s happened when you have conversations like this. Your child used to value your interest or input, but now it seems that even simple conversations turn into arguments.

There are reasons for your child’s behavior. And there’s also good news: this phase will usually pass.

Disrespect: where does it come from?

Not all teenagers are rude or disrespectful, but disrespect is a common part of teenage growth and development.

This is partly because your child is expressing and testing independent ideas, so there’ll be times when you disagree. Developing independence is a key part of growing up. It’s a good sign that your child is trying to take more responsibility. But your child is also still learning how to handle disagreement and differing opinions appropriately.

Also, your child is trying to balance their need for privacy with your need to stay connected and show you care. So sometimes you might get a rude or disrespectful response because your child feels you’re taking too much interest in what they’re doing or invading their space.

Your child’s moods can change quickly too. Because of the way teenage brains develop, your child can’t always handle changing feelings and reactions to everyday or unexpected things. And this can sometimes lead to over-sensitivity, which can lead in turn to grumpiness or rudeness. Teenage brain development can also affect your child’s ability to empathize and understand other people’s perspectives, including yours.

Sometimes disrespectful behavior might be a sign that your child is feeling particularly stressed or worried.

Teenagers are also starting to think more deeply about things, so they can have thoughts and feelings they’ve never had before. Some young people seem to have a conflicting and radical view on everything, and might question previously held beliefs. This shift to deeper thinking is a normal part of development too.

And sometimes teenagers are disrespectful because they think it might be a way to impress others, or because they’ve seen their friends behave this way.

Things to avoid with teenage disrespect and defiance

Help Your Teens BigstockAngerTeen-300x194 How to Help My Disrespectful Teen Arguing rarely works for parents or teenagers. When we get angry, we can say things we don’t mean. A more effective approach is to give yourself and your child some time to calm down.

If you’re angry or in the middle of an argument, it will be hard to calmly discuss what you expect of your child. A more effective approach is to tell your child that you want to talk, and agree on a time.

Being defensive is very rarely useful. Try not to take things personally. It might help to remind yourself that your child is trying to assert their independence.

Even though you have more life experience, lecturing your child about how to behave is likely to turn them off listening. If you want your child to listen to you, you might need to spend time actively listening to your child.

Nagging isn’t likely to have much effect. It might increase your frustration, and your child will probably just switch off.

Sarcasm will almost certainly create resentment and increase the distance between you and your child.

When to be concerned about teenage disrespect and defiance

If your child’s attitude towards you and your family doesn’t respond to any of the strategies suggested above, it might be a warning sign that there’s a deeper problem.

You might also be worried if:

  • there are changes in your child’s attitude or mood
  • your child withdraws from family, friends or usual activities
  • grades are dropping, underachieving in school
  • loss of interest in his favorite activities (sports, hobbies)
  • your child runs away from home or stops going to school regularly.

If you’re concerned about your child’s behavior, here are some things you can do:

  • Consider seeking professional support – good people to talk to include school counselors, teachers and adolescent therapist.
  • Discuss the issue as a family, and try to work out ways of supporting each other.
  • Talk to other parents and find out what they do.
Source: Raising Children Parenting Website

If you have exhausted your local resources and therapy isn’t working, it might be time to consider residential therapy. Contact us for more information.

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Can Teen Help Programs Help Rebellious Teens

Posted by Sue Scheff on September 03, 2021  /   Posted in Teen Help

Will Teen Help Programs Help My Rebellious Teenager?

Eye rolling, curses, insults, backtalk, name-calling, ignored requests, snide comments: disrespect from your teen comes in many different forms.

If you’re dealing with a defiant, rebellious and disrespectful teenager, you’re not alone. This is one of the most common complaints we hear from parents today. Today’s teen has zero respect for authority – it’s not like generation’s earlier. When our parents told us to come home at 10pm, there was never a question – we were actually home ten minutes earlier!

Help Your Teens bigstock-Upset-Mom-And-Daughter-29710640-300x200 Can Teen Help Programs Help Rebellious Teens Backtalk? We wouldn’t dream of it, unless we enjoyed the taste of soap – or a good whipping! Yes, I said it.

I’m not saying any of us were abused, I’m only saying our parents were allowed to discipline us – and we learned respect very early in our tween-age life.

Not so much today. We’re living in an entitlement generation.

Disrespectful or rude behavior in teenagers is something many parents face at some point.

About disrespectful and defiant behavior in teenagers

Sometimes you might feel that interactions with your child all seem a bit like this:

  • You – ‘How’s that project going?’
  • Your child – ‘Why are you checking up on me? Don’t you trust me? I always get good marks, so why ask me about it?’
  • You – ‘I was only asking. I just wanted to know if you’re going OK with it …’
  • Your child – ‘Sure you were … mumble, mumble, mumble.’

As a parent, you might feel hurt, worried and unsure about what’s happened when you have conversations like this. Your child used to value your interest or input, but now it seems that even simple conversations turn into arguments.

There are reasons for your child’s behavior. And there’s also good news: this phase will usually pass.

Disrespect: where does it come from?

Not all teenagers are rude or disrespectful, but disrespect is a common part of teenage growth and development.

This is partly because your child is expressing and testing independent ideas, so there’ll be times when you disagree. Developing independence is a key part of growing up. It’s a good sign that your child is trying to take more responsibility. But your child is also still learning how to handle disagreement and differing opinions appropriately.

Also, your child is trying to balance their need for privacy with your need to stay connected and show you care. So sometimes you might get a rude or disrespectful response because your child feels you’re taking too much interest in what they’re doing or invading their space.

Your child’s moods can change quickly too. Because of the way teenage brains develop, your child can’t always handle changing feelings and reactions to everyday or unexpected things. And this can sometimes lead to over-sensitivity, which can lead in turn to grumpiness or rudeness. Teenage brain development can also affect your child’s ability to empathize and understand other people’s perspectives, including yours.

Sometimes disrespectful behavior might be a sign that your child is feeling particularly stressed or worried.

Teenagers are also starting to think more deeply about things, so they can have thoughts and feelings they’ve never had before. Some young people seem to have a conflicting and radical view on everything, and might question previously held beliefs. This shift to deeper thinking is a normal part of development too.

And sometimes teenagers are disrespectful because they think it might be a way to impress others, or because they’ve seen their friends behave this way.

Things to avoid with teenage disrespect and defiance

Help Your Teens BigstockAngerTeen-300x194 Can Teen Help Programs Help Rebellious Teens Arguing rarely works for parents or teenagers. When we get angry, we can say things we don’t mean. A more effective approach is to give yourself and your child some time to calm down.

If you’re angry or in the middle of an argument, it will be hard to calmly discuss what you expect of your child. A more effective approach is to tell your child that you want to talk, and agree on a time.

Being defensive is very rarely useful. Try not to take things personally. It might help to remind yourself that your child is trying to assert their independence.

Even though you have more life experience, lecturing your child about how to behave is likely to turn them off listening. If you want your child to listen to you, you might need to spend time actively listening to your child.

Nagging isn’t likely to have much effect. It might increase your frustration, and your child will probably just switch off.

Sarcasm will almost certainly create resentment and increase the distance between you and your child.

When to be concerned about teenage disrespect and defiance

If your child’s attitude towards you and your family doesn’t respond to any of the strategies suggested above, it might be a warning sign that there’s a deeper problem.

You might also be worried if:

  • there are changes in your child’s attitude or mood
  • your child withdraws from family, friends or usual activities
  • grades are dropping, underachieving in school
  • loss of interest in his favorite activities (sports, hobbies)
  • your child runs away from home or stops going to school regularly.

If you’re concerned about your child’s behavior, here are some things you can do:

  • Consider seeking professional support – good people to talk to include school counselors, teachers and adolescent therapist.
  • Discuss the issue as a family, and try to work out ways of supporting each other.
  • Talk to other parents and find out what they do.
Source: Raising Children Parenting Website

If you have exhausted your local resources and therapy isn’t working, it might be time to consider residential therapy. Contact us for more information.

Tags: ,,

How to Help My Defiant Teen

Posted by Sue Scheff on September 03, 2021  /   Posted in Uncategorized

Finding Help for My Defiant Teen

Was your teen diagnosed with oppositional defiance disorder?

Help Your Teens BigstockDefiantGirl-300x201 How to Help My Defiant Teen Oppositional defiance disorder (ODD) is commonly heard with teens especially as their hormones are raging and if they are also diagnosed with ADD or ADHD.

ODD is a condition in which a child displays an ongoing pattern of uncooperative, defiant, hostile, and annoying behavior toward people in authority. The child’s behavior often disrupts the child’s normal daily activities, including activities within the family and at school.

Many children and teens with ODD also have other behavioral problems, such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, learning disabilities, mood disorders (such as depression), and anxiety disorders. Some children with ODD go on to develop a more serious behavior disorder called conduct disorder. – Source Web MD.

Teens struggling with anger, rage, stress and anxiety due to ODD typically are not treated with medications.  It is about finding ways to handle the negative feelings and impulsiveness as they start escalating.

Symptoms of ODD

A pattern of negativistic, hostile, and defiant behavior lasting at least 6 months, during which four (or more) of the following are present ( Source-PsychCentral):

  • often loses temper
  • often argues with adults
  • often actively defies or refuses to comply with adults’ requests or rules
  • often deliberately annoys people
  • often blames others for his or her mistakes or misbehavior
  • is often touchy or easily annoyed by others
  • is often angry and resentful
  • is often spiteful or vindictive

Help Your Teens PexelsSadBoy-300x206 How to Help My Defiant Teen Seeking help through local therapy and possibly anger and stress management classes can be beneficial.

However as we know with most defiant teens will refuse to attend and will likely shut-down.  This is not in all cases, but it is very common.  Teens can be extremely stubborn.

This is why therapeutic boarding schools and residential therapy has been successful in treating these situations.  They are able to help your teen face their issues among their peers that are having the same feelings.

When they are placed outside of their environment it removes the pressures from home conflict and other issues that might be holding them back from opening up.  Don’t be mistaken, the family is still very involved in the recovery process.  It is about bring the family back together.

It’s rare that the one hour once a week on a counselors couch will make significant changes if you are dealing with a teen that has been struggling for over six months with these problems.

For more information on residential therapy options that specialize with oppositional defiance disorder, ADD/ADHD please contact us.

Also check our resources on the library page.

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Will Teen Help Programs Help Cellphone Addiction

Posted by Sue Scheff on September 03, 2021  /   Posted in Parenting Teens, Teen Help

Can Teen Help Programs Help Cellphone Addiction?

Teen Cellphone and Internet Addiction

Help Your Teens BigstockMomTeenonCell-300x199 Will Teen Help Programs Help Cellphone Addiction In today’s society, the internet can be a valuable asset and educational tool, as well as a dangerous attraction and lethal weapon.

Many teens are turning to social networking sites such as Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and TikTok to make friends, mingle and more.

An unfortunate reality is that potential predators can also sign up and chat with your kids.

Social networking are many teens’ ways of communication which can be entertaining and fun; yet, if they are not careful, it can also be unsafe.

Teen Internet Addiction Warning Signs:

  • Your teen may suffer from anxiety. They may use the internet to distract themselves from worries and fears. An anxiety disorder like obsessive-compulsive disorder may also contribute to excessive email checking and compulsive internet use.
  • They are depressed. The Internet can be an escape from feelings of depression, but too much time online can make things worse. Internet addiction further contributes to stress, isolation, and loneliness.
  • They have any other addictions. Many internet addicts suffer from other addictions, such as drugs, alcohol, gambling, and sex.
  • They lack social support. Internet addicts often use social networking sites, instant messaging, or online gaming as a safe way of establishing new relationships and more confidently relating to others.
  • They are an unhappy teenager. They might be wondering where they fit in and the internet could feel more comfortable than real life.
  • They are less mobile or socially active than they once were. Some are withdrawing from activies (sports and family events) as well as isolating themselves.
  • They are stressed. While some people use the internet to relieve stress, it can have a counterproductive effect. The longer you spend online, the higher your stress levels will be.

An educated parent is better equipped to help limit potential danger of internet predators and online identity theft, as well as helping them develop a healthy relationship with technology.

Is cellphone addiction real? YES!

Help Your Teens PexelTeenCell5-300x205 Will Teen Help Programs Help Cellphone Addiction Today we are facing a time when teen depression is on the rise. Young people are struggling with anxiety, stress and overwhelmed by peer pressure. They are completely immersed in their screens without considering their emotional or physical health.

Have you tried:

  • Phone contracts
  • Removing their devices
  • Local therapy
  • Digital detox plans

But find your teen still falling back into their old obsessive patterns?

At P.U.R.E.™ we promote parent awareness to help you, as parents, understand that it’s not about removing the devices as much as it’s about helping your teen learn more about the risks behind the screen. In addition to the consequences of what they post and the impact it can have on their future.

These are only some of the concerns, while the most important issue is your child’s mental wellness. If you feel that it has now taken over their lives – and yours, it might be time to consider outside help.

Quality residential therapy can help students to detox from their screen addiction and learn how to self-regulate, as they participate in individual and group therapy. They will eventually have a healthy relationship with devices. The fact is, technology is only growing – it’s not going away.

P.U.R.E.™ invites you to fill out a free consultation form for more information on finding the appropriate help for your teen.

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Will Therapeutic Boarding Schools Help Teen Internet Addiction

Posted by Sue Scheff on September 03, 2021  /   Posted in Digital Parenting, Internet Addiction

Can Teen Help Programs Help Internet Addiction?

Teen Internet Addiction, Internet Predators and Online Identity Theft

Help Your Teens BigstockMomTeenonCell-300x199 Will Therapeutic Boarding Schools Help Teen Internet Addiction In today’s society, the internet can be a valuable asset and educational tool, as well as a dangerous attraction and lethal weapon. Many teens are turning to social networking sites such as Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and TikTok to make friends, mingle and more. An unfortunate reality is that potential predators can also sign up and chat with your kids.

As seen in Dateline’s Series “To Catch A Predator,” many kids are preyed upon by adults (both young and old), which can lead to trouble for all involved, especially teens.

Social networking are many teens’ ways of communication which can be entertaining and fun; yet, if they are not careful, it can also be unsafe.

Teen Internet Addiction Warning Signs:

  • Your teen may suffer from anxiety. They may use the internet to distract themselves from worries and fears. An anxiety disorder like obsessive-compulsive disorder may also contribute to excessive email checking and compulsive internet use.
  • They are depressed. The Internet can be an escape from feelings of depression, but too much time online can make things worse. Internet addiction further contributes to stress, isolation, and loneliness.
  • They have any other addictions. Many internet addicts suffer from other addictions, such as drugs, alcohol, gambling, and sex.
  • They lack social support. Internet addicts often use social networking sites, instant messaging, or online gaming as a safe way of establishing new relationships and more confidently relating to others.
  • They are an unhappy teenager. They might be wondering where they fit in and the internet could feel more comfortable than real life.
  • They are less mobile or socially active than they once were. Some are withdrawing from activies (sports and family events) as well as isolating themselves.
  • They are stressed. While some people use the internet to relieve stress, it can have a counterproductive effect. The longer you spend online, the higher your stress levels will be.

An educated parent is better equipped to help limit potential danger of internet predators and online identity theft, as well as helping them develop a healthy relationship with technology.

Is internet addiction real? YES!

Help Your Teens PexelTeenCell5-300x205 Will Therapeutic Boarding Schools Help Teen Internet Addiction Today we are facing a time when teen depression is on the rise. Young people are struggling with anxiety, stress and overwhelmed by peer pressure. They are completely immersed in their screens without considering their emotional or physical health.

Have you tried:

  • Phone contracts
  • Removing their devices
  • Local therapy
  • Digital detox plans

But find your teen still falling back into their old obsessive patterns?

At P.U.R.E.™ we promote parent awareness to help you, as parents, understand that it’s not about removing the devices as much as it’s about helping your teen learn more about the risks behind the screen. In addition to the consequences of what they post and the impact it can have on their future.

These are only some of the concerns, while the most important issue is your child’s mental wellness. If you feel that it has now taken over their lives – and yours, it might be time to consider outside help.

Quality residential therapy can help students to detox from their screen addiction and learn how to self-regulate, as they participate in individual and group therapy. They will eventually have a healthy relationship with devices. The fact is, technology is only growing – it’s not going away.

P.U.R.E.™ invites you to fill out a free consultation form for more information on finding the appropriate help for your teen.

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Anxiety Relief for Teens: Essential CBT Skills and Mindfulness Practices to Overcome Anxiety and Stress

Posted by Sue Scheff on September 02, 2021  /   Posted in Featured Book, Mental Health, Parenting Books, Parenting Teens

Anxiety Relief for Teens: Essential CBT Skills and Mindfulness Practices to Overcome Anxiety and Stress

By Regine Galanti, PhD

Help Your Teens BookAnxietyRelief-194x300 Anxiety Relief for Teens: Essential CBT Skills and Mindfulness Practices to Overcome Anxiety and Stress Is anxiety disrupting your life? With proven CBT-based skills and mindfulness techniques, this book can be your guide out of the spiraling stress of anxiety and get you back on track to living a happy and healthy life.

Getting good grades, keeping up with social media, maintaining friendships… you have a lot on your plate and it’s more difficult when you add anxiety to the mix. You may even be avoiding situations, events, or people that could trigger your anxiety. So, how do you stop yourself from missing out on life?

With Anxiety Relief for Teens, Dr. Regine Galanti teaches you how CBT-based skills and mindfulness techniques can help you manage your anxiety and reverse negative patterns. Through simple and effective exercises that help you change your thoughts, behaviors, and physical reactions, this helpful guide gives you the tools you need to navigate all of life’s challenges.

Anxiety Relief for Teens features:

  Quizzes and self-assessments to better understand your anxiety and emotions and discover their respective triggers.
  30+ CBT-based tools to manage your anxiety along with practical strategies for dealing with challenging emotions such as anger and sadness.
  30+ mindfulness practices to cope with your anxiety in the present moment through visualizations, breathing, meditation, and other exercises.

Take a peek inside the book:

Help Your Teens BookAnxietyInside-1024x637 Anxiety Relief for Teens: Essential CBT Skills and Mindfulness Practices to Overcome Anxiety and Stress

About the author:

Regine Galanti, PhD, is a licensed clinical psychologist and the founder of Long Island Behavioral Psychology in Long Island, New York, where she brings warmth, sensitivity, and a tailored problem-solving approach to her practice. She specializes in cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and has expertise in obsessive-compulsive disorder, anxiety, parenting, and behavior problems.

She applies short-term, evidence-based strategies to help young people change their thoughts and behaviors. Specifically, she uses exposure and related behavioral therapy techniques to help those living with anxiety face their fears so they can live happier, healthier lives.

Order on Amazon today.

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Help Your Teen Beat School Stress: 8 Proven Strategies

Posted by Sue Scheff on September 01, 2021  /   Posted in Featured Article, Mental Health, Parenting Teens, Teen Depression, Teen Help

School: New stressors

Help Your Teens PexelTeenStress-196x300 Help Your Teen Beat School Stress: 8 Proven Strategies Our teens will experience stress many times in their lives. Short-term stressful situations are part of the normal course of life: they are natural and generally useful. But there is also stress that paralyzes the child, pressures him, and does not allow them to live and develop.

  • Excessive demands when the program does not correspond to the child’s abilities. 
  • Stressful tactics of pedagogical influence. The too-fast pace of work, hurtful nicknames and mockery; reprimanding a child in front of the whole class can become a childhood trauma. 
  • Inadequate pedagogical methods. 
  • Problems with the organization of the learning process. If a child has to reread what they were taught in class, if they don’t understand how to do the homework – then the lessons at school are ineffective.  
  • Conflicts. Unfortunately, some conflicts last not for a couple of days, but much longer. They become chronic and turn into the factors of toxic anxiety.
  • Lack of psychological support in school. Teachers and parents may lack sensitivity to notice that the child does not cope with stress. There always must be a school psychologist.

A few words about emotional abuse

It is a special stress factor that a child can face at home, at school, and even on the street. That is not only threats and insults, not only fear of punishment but everything that destroys the friendly environment around the child. That is adults’ shifted eyebrows or their tense silence.

The quiet threatening prophecy: “You’ll never be able to write the best essays”. The indifferent tone, the frightening facial expression: “I look at him, he immediately begins to obey, and he starts to be afraid of me”.

Emotional violence cannot strengthen the child or make him stronger. It deprives him or her of a feeling of safety and the possibility of making a mistake without serious consequences. More often than not, adults do hurt children emotionally because they are simply tired and on the verge of emotional burnout.

A teacher is a profession with a high risk of burnout, so parents should take a closer look at the teacher’s well-being if the child clearly “brings” traces of severe stress from school. Being in a stressful situation for most of the week poses a threat to the mental and physical health of the child.

If you notice that the teacher treats children aloof, indifferent, and cold – try not to stir up conflict, but protect the child. If it is not possible to establish contact with the teacher and soften the pressure, for the sake of the child it is better to change the school. 

Develop the stress-resistance of the students:

It is worth remembering: the brain does best what it does most often. It is in our power to train a child’s brain for success, for an even alternation of tension and rest, a calm attitude toward difficulties and a keen search for solutions. 

Here are tips from an adolescent psychologist

  • Maintain, support, cultivate a favourable, calm, friendly atmosphere in the family. In difficult situations there is no need to panic, you should remember that “it’s always darkest before the dawn.”
  • Try to communicate regularly, talk to the child about topics related to his or her experiences, feelings and emotions. Be sure to discuss the near and distant future. Try to build (but not impose) prospects together. Share your experiences, thoughts, suggest how to write a paper in an hour if needed. Sympathize, tell him that you understand how difficult it is for him now. Children who feel support and sincere sympathy from parents cope with stress more successfully.
  • Teach the child to express emotions in socially acceptable forms (aggression – through active sports, physical activity that can be done at home or outdoors; emotional distress – through a trusting conversation with relatives that brings relief). It is often difficult for a child (especially a teenager) to talk about experiences. Suggest that the child have a notebook. By putting their emotions on paper, they will feel relieved to be free of possible negative thoughts.
  • Encourage the child to be physically active. Stress is, first of all, a physical reaction of the body. Any activity which requires physical effort will help the child to struggle effectively with it. It can be house cleaning, physical exercises, singing, dancing etc. Try not to force the child to spend energy on something that is not interesting. Determine together what kind of active activity they would like to do while at home.
  • Support and encourage your child’s creative handiwork  (drawing, weaving “braids”, working for cheap writing services, glueing models). Even if it seems to you that the teenager does nothing useful. All this is a kind of “discharge”. Through the work, the teenager gets distracted from negative experiences and everyday problems.
  • Encourage the child to take care of neighbours (elderly people, younger children, pets). Pleasant duties, feeling that someone depends on them is an additional resource for coping with possible stress.
  • Maintain family traditions and rituals. It is important that a good family tradition is interesting, useful and loved by all generations of the family. So that the youth enjoy participating in them and do not perceive them as an unavoidable, boring, useless pastime.
  • Try to support the child’s daily routine (sleep, eating habits). Give the child more often the opportunity to get joy, satisfaction from everyday pleasures (a tasty meal, taking a relaxing bath, talking to friends on the phone, etc.).

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