fbpx
^ Back to Top
954-260-0805

Teen Stress

How to Help Teens Cope with Stress and Uncertainies in Life

Posted by Sue Scheff on September 16, 2021  /   Posted in Teen Depression, Teen Help

How to Guide Your Teen Through Uncertainties About the Future

Help Your Teens PexelSadTeen-300x199 How to Help Teens Cope with Stress and Uncertainies in Life Teenagers today are subject to a lot of pressure as they plan for their future in these uncertain times. Saving up for college, part-time work, and the pressure to achieve can be emotionally taxing for your high schooler.

As a parent, you can guide your teen through these challenges and put their minds at ease as they prepare for adulthood. 

The Impact of Stress on Teens

In a 2018 survey, the American Psychological Association reported that teenagers experience more anxiety and depression than adults. The pandemic has made this situation much worse. Isolation caused by school closures, worry about getting sick, and related issues have put adolescents at greater risk for mental health issues.

How can you help your teenage child with anxiety? The first step is discovering if your child has a problem. Teens may not answer questions about their mental health adequately. Look for telltale signs of stress and depression such as:

  • Physical symptoms including headaches, stomach aches, or exhaustion
  • Loss of interest in activities or loss of appetite
  • Irregular sleep habits
  • Difficulty focusing or making decisions
  • Withdrawal, seclusion, or apathy

Teach Your Child to Manage Stress

Help Your Teens BigstockFatherSon-300x200 How to Help Teens Cope with Stress and Uncertainies in Life If your child seems to be struggling with these issues, you can employ several strategies to help them manage their stress. One of the most important is to create a peaceful environment in your home. Even the most functional families can overreact in stressful times. However, you can choose to react calmly when in times of crisis.

When you feel the urge to lose your temper because of your teen’s behavior or actions, take a step back and breathe for a few moments before engaging them. Show how to handle a difficult situation instead of telling them to calm down when they are angry.

Another key is to communicate openly and frequently with your child. Invite them to offer their opinions, input, and ideas on everything from planning family traditions to current events. Be honest with them about your feelings as well. And when you see them accomplish their goals or share their experiences, take the time to acknowledge and encourage their efforts.

Another way to reduce their stress is to help your teens take ownership of their health. Exercise, proper sleep, and nutritious food choices can reduce anxiety. When these habits improve how they feel, they will make them part of their routine. 

The next step is to help them plan for their future to reduce the pressure they experience today.

Planning for a Career Path

The goal of high school is to guide your child onto a career path, which can lead to a great deal of tension. They may suffer performance anxiety in academics or athletics, worry about college admission or tuition expenses, and stress over a high school career that will help them achieve their goals.

Choosing a career path can be confusing. Sit down with your teen to explore different options. Review their strengths and interests but keep in mind that these alone will not always help them find the best options.

If they are concerned about employment opportunities in the future, have them look at jobs or industries that are in need or are growing. For example, there is a shortage of medical doctors and other health providers in the U.S. This shortage is expected to increase over the next 20 years as older physicians retire. Pursuing a degree in medicine, nursing, or other healthcare disciplines will be valuable in times to come.

Finally, remember to tell your teen that they need not stress too much over future career paths. Their early college years have basic electives and introductory courses in their chosen profession, allowing them to get a taste of their potential career. There is enough time to change their path before advancing too far. 

Connect your teens with professionals in the field to get an idea of what the job entails. They should also talk to successful professionals who changed their major in college. 

Teens are not just worried about their careers. Financial security in today’s economy is another anxiety-inducing concern.

Planning for Financial Security

Your child may be worried about their financial future. Tuition costs are one concern. They may even be aware that many millennials struggle to buy a home thanks to outstanding college debt. Another worry they have is figuring out how to build good credit for a future mortgage.

Even if buying a home is far off for your teens, they may be considering other expenses, like traveling to Europe or buying a car. 

Help your teen reduce stress about the future by teaching them the basics of financial security. You can cover budgeting, saving, and investing topics in a more practical way than a school course. Teach your teens savvy financial habits such as these:

  • Put money aside every week once they have a job or from their allowance.
  • Have them set a small goal for some of their savings, such as a new phone.
  • Get them to track their spending to achieve this goal. Teach them to set up an income and expenditures spreadsheet.
  • If your child is very responsible, you can add them to your credit card as an authorized user to help them establish a credit history and score.

Teens have a lot of pressure on them to succeed today. You can model and teach good habits to manage that stress. In addition, helping them for a career and financial security will ensure a successful future.

Tags: ,,

Is My Teen Suffering with School Stress

Posted by Sue Scheff on September 03, 2021  /   Posted in Mental Health, Teen Help

Ways Teens Can Prevent School Stress

Help Your Teens PexelStudyTeen-300x205 Is My Teen Suffering with School Stress Teenagers often face a lot of challenges at this part of their lives, especially with school. They’re growing, studying, learning, and so on. 

But with that said, the daily pressures of school can cause stress, which can affect how your teen is sleeping at night. While the lack of sleep is normal for teenagers, it doesn’t have to be this way.

This quick guide will explore why sleep is important for teens, and how they can get a good night’s sleep despite the stresses that can come from school.

Why So Sleepy?

“Believe it or not, a teenager’s life can be very hectic, even in school,” says Zachary Hincks, a health writer at Boom Essays. “The problem is, there’s an obvious need for ‘downtime,’ so that teens can rejuvenate and be more alert and relaxed during their school days. The Centers for Disease Control and Protection, or the CDC, suggests that teens should sleep between 8 and 10 hours per 24 hours. However, late nights are tempting for teens, whether they’re hitting the books, cramming for a test the next day, or out with friends.”

Why Does Sleep Matter?

Help Your Teens PexelSleepingTeen-300x200 Is My Teen Suffering with School Stress Sleep is crucial for teens, because the lack of it can lead to the following:

With sleep, teens will be able to gain more energy for the next day, even when they’ve had a rough day at school the day before. 

Tips For Teens To Sleep Well

So, now that you know how important it is for your teen(s) to get a good night’s sleep, here are some helpful tips on how you can ensure that they’re resting well. With these tips, you can help them prevent the stresses of school from eating away at them:

    • Having a bedtime routine should consist of the following: 
      • Having a consistent bedtime (say, 8:00 PM every night)
      • A light snack before bed
      • Keeping the room dark, cool, and quiet at night
      • Turning the lights on (or open the curtains) right after they get up in the morning
    • The bed should be for sleeping only. That means teens should do their homework, be on mobile devices, etc. off and away from the bed. 
    • Limit your teen’s naps to 30 minutes or less.
    • Make sure your teen is exercising every day.
    • Limit your teen’s caffeine (i.e., coffee, soda, tea, energy drinks) intake. 
    • Don’t heavily rely on over-the-counter sleep aids to help your teen sleep. 
    • Don’t ever let your teen aid their sleep with drugs or alcohol.
    • Limit your teen’s screen time before bedtime.
    • Have your teen keep a sleep diary to keep track of:
      • What time(s) they’ve been going to bed
      • What’s causing them to have difficulty sleeping
      • Any upcoming tests and or events that they might be worrying about, etc.

What Teens Can Do If They Can’t Fall Asleep

“Sometimes, despite taking the necessary steps in getting ready for bed, teens may still find it hard to simply fall asleep,” says Jamie Sambell, a psychology blogger at Paper Fellows. “The best thing for them to do is to get up and distract themselves with reading or drawing until they get tired. This allows your body to prep for sleep naturally.”

When Teens Should See A Doctor

Seeing a doctor can be a last resort, if your teen(s) are still having trouble sleeping at night. You may want to take note of your teen’s sleep habits as you take them to the doctor.

With that said, contact your teen’s doctor, if they’re experiencing the following: 

    • Waking up during the night, and can’t go back to sleep
    • Waking too early in the morning
    • Lack of energy despite getting enough sleep
    • Not doing homework
    • Not attending school
    • Having excessive feelings of sadness, depression, and or anxiety
    • Lack of focus
    • Other illnesses or ailments (i.e., loss of appetite, headaches, etc.)

Conclusion

As you can see, sleep is essential for teen(s). While school is extremely important, so is a good night’s sleep.

We hope that this guide was helpful in understanding why sleep is important to your teen(s), and how you can ensure that they’re sleeping well at night. With this guide in mind, you can help them prevent the stresses of school from eating away at them.

If you feel you have exhausted your local resources, please contact us for information on residential therapy options.

Contributor: Elizabeth Hines 

 

Tags: ,

Anxiety Relief for Teens: Essential CBT Skills and Mindfulness Practices to Overcome Anxiety and Stress

Posted by Sue Scheff on September 02, 2021  /   Posted in Featured Book, Mental Health, Parenting Books, Parenting Teens

Anxiety Relief for Teens: Essential CBT Skills and Mindfulness Practices to Overcome Anxiety and Stress

By Regine Galanti, PhD

Help Your Teens BookAnxietyRelief-194x300 Anxiety Relief for Teens: Essential CBT Skills and Mindfulness Practices to Overcome Anxiety and Stress Is anxiety disrupting your life? With proven CBT-based skills and mindfulness techniques, this book can be your guide out of the spiraling stress of anxiety and get you back on track to living a happy and healthy life.

Getting good grades, keeping up with social media, maintaining friendships… you have a lot on your plate and it’s more difficult when you add anxiety to the mix. You may even be avoiding situations, events, or people that could trigger your anxiety. So, how do you stop yourself from missing out on life?

With Anxiety Relief for Teens, Dr. Regine Galanti teaches you how CBT-based skills and mindfulness techniques can help you manage your anxiety and reverse negative patterns. Through simple and effective exercises that help you change your thoughts, behaviors, and physical reactions, this helpful guide gives you the tools you need to navigate all of life’s challenges.

Anxiety Relief for Teens features:

  Quizzes and self-assessments to better understand your anxiety and emotions and discover their respective triggers.
  30+ CBT-based tools to manage your anxiety along with practical strategies for dealing with challenging emotions such as anger and sadness.
  30+ mindfulness practices to cope with your anxiety in the present moment through visualizations, breathing, meditation, and other exercises.

Take a peek inside the book:

Help Your Teens BookAnxietyInside-1024x637 Anxiety Relief for Teens: Essential CBT Skills and Mindfulness Practices to Overcome Anxiety and Stress

About the author:

Regine Galanti, PhD, is a licensed clinical psychologist and the founder of Long Island Behavioral Psychology in Long Island, New York, where she brings warmth, sensitivity, and a tailored problem-solving approach to her practice. She specializes in cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and has expertise in obsessive-compulsive disorder, anxiety, parenting, and behavior problems.

She applies short-term, evidence-based strategies to help young people change their thoughts and behaviors. Specifically, she uses exposure and related behavioral therapy techniques to help those living with anxiety face their fears so they can live happier, healthier lives.

Order on Amazon today.

Tags: ,,,

Help Your Teen Beat School Stress: 8 Proven Strategies

Posted by Sue Scheff on September 01, 2021  /   Posted in Featured Article, Mental Health, Parenting Teens, Teen Depression, Teen Help

School: New stressors

Help Your Teens PexelTeenStress-196x300 Help Your Teen Beat School Stress: 8 Proven Strategies Our teens will experience stress many times in their lives. Short-term stressful situations are part of the normal course of life: they are natural and generally useful. But there is also stress that paralyzes the child, pressures him, and does not allow them to live and develop.

  • Excessive demands when the program does not correspond to the child’s abilities. 
  • Stressful tactics of pedagogical influence. The too-fast pace of work, hurtful nicknames and mockery; reprimanding a child in front of the whole class can become a childhood trauma. 
  • Inadequate pedagogical methods. 
  • Problems with the organization of the learning process. If a child has to reread what they were taught in class, if they don’t understand how to do the homework – then the lessons at school are ineffective.  
  • Conflicts. Unfortunately, some conflicts last not for a couple of days, but much longer. They become chronic and turn into the factors of toxic anxiety.
  • Lack of psychological support in school. Teachers and parents may lack sensitivity to notice that the child does not cope with stress. There always must be a school psychologist.

A few words about emotional abuse

It is a special stress factor that a child can face at home, at school, and even on the street. That is not only threats and insults, not only fear of punishment but everything that destroys the friendly environment around the child. That is adults’ shifted eyebrows or their tense silence.

The quiet threatening prophecy: “You’ll never be able to write the best essays”. The indifferent tone, the frightening facial expression: “I look at him, he immediately begins to obey, and he starts to be afraid of me”.

Emotional violence cannot strengthen the child or make him stronger. It deprives him or her of a feeling of safety and the possibility of making a mistake without serious consequences. More often than not, adults do hurt children emotionally because they are simply tired and on the verge of emotional burnout.

A teacher is a profession with a high risk of burnout, so parents should take a closer look at the teacher’s well-being if the child clearly “brings” traces of severe stress from school. Being in a stressful situation for most of the week poses a threat to the mental and physical health of the child.

If you notice that the teacher treats children aloof, indifferent, and cold – try not to stir up conflict, but protect the child. If it is not possible to establish contact with the teacher and soften the pressure, for the sake of the child it is better to change the school. 

Develop the stress-resistance of the students:

It is worth remembering: the brain does best what it does most often. It is in our power to train a child’s brain for success, for an even alternation of tension and rest, a calm attitude toward difficulties and a keen search for solutions. 

Here are tips from an adolescent psychologist

  • Maintain, support, cultivate a favourable, calm, friendly atmosphere in the family. In difficult situations there is no need to panic, you should remember that “it’s always darkest before the dawn.”
  • Try to communicate regularly, talk to the child about topics related to his or her experiences, feelings and emotions. Be sure to discuss the near and distant future. Try to build (but not impose) prospects together. Share your experiences, thoughts, suggest how to write a paper in an hour if needed. Sympathize, tell him that you understand how difficult it is for him now. Children who feel support and sincere sympathy from parents cope with stress more successfully.
  • Teach the child to express emotions in socially acceptable forms (aggression – through active sports, physical activity that can be done at home or outdoors; emotional distress – through a trusting conversation with relatives that brings relief). It is often difficult for a child (especially a teenager) to talk about experiences. Suggest that the child have a notebook. By putting their emotions on paper, they will feel relieved to be free of possible negative thoughts.
  • Encourage the child to be physically active. Stress is, first of all, a physical reaction of the body. Any activity which requires physical effort will help the child to struggle effectively with it. It can be house cleaning, physical exercises, singing, dancing etc. Try not to force the child to spend energy on something that is not interesting. Determine together what kind of active activity they would like to do while at home.
  • Support and encourage your child’s creative handiwork  (drawing, weaving “braids”, working for cheap writing services, glueing models). Even if it seems to you that the teenager does nothing useful. All this is a kind of “discharge”. Through the work, the teenager gets distracted from negative experiences and everyday problems.
  • Encourage the child to take care of neighbours (elderly people, younger children, pets). Pleasant duties, feeling that someone depends on them is an additional resource for coping with possible stress.
  • Maintain family traditions and rituals. It is important that a good family tradition is interesting, useful and loved by all generations of the family. So that the youth enjoy participating in them and do not perceive them as an unavoidable, boring, useless pastime.
  • Try to support the child’s daily routine (sleep, eating habits). Give the child more often the opportunity to get joy, satisfaction from everyday pleasures (a tasty meal, taking a relaxing bath, talking to friends on the phone, etc.).

Tags: ,,

How School Assignments Affect Your Teen: Preventing Stress and Anxiety

Posted by Sue Scheff on August 16, 2021  /   Posted in Featured Article, Teen Depression, Teen Help

The Challenges of Homework: 5 Helpful Tips to Prevent Teen Stress

Help Your Teens FreePikTeenStress-300x197 How School Assignments Affect Your Teen: Preventing Stress and Anxiety Stress is a part of everyday life, and schoolwork, busy schedules, responsibilities at home, deadlines, social drama and the expectations of others can all create stress in teens. 

 

If they have an active social calendar and do so many activities that they don’t have time for homework, that can stress them out and it’s all about finding a balance. Learning to manage stress means teens need to build coping skills that enable them to take daily challenges in their stride.  

 

Practice good time management

 

Encourage your teen to practice good time management by keeping track of assignments, practices, etc, with a planning app or calendar. The constant feeling that time is running out can be very stressful and planning can help to give a feeling of control. 

 

Of course, it doesn’t help to plan carefully and then not stick to the plan. Managing stress also means not procrastinating and keeping on top of assignments etc. Having a plan will give your teen the opportunity to reflect at the end of each day on how things are going and what tasks may need more time than others. 

 

Teens can start learning how to break their tasks down into manageable chunks and include time to relax or socialize. They can also learn how to divide their work into urgent, non-urgent, important and non-important tasks.  

 

Make time to exercise daily

 

One of the best ways for teens to manage stress is to get exercise every day and this exercise doesn’t necessarily have to come in the form of a hectic gym session. 

 

Taking a bike ride or taking deep breaths on a run releases chemicals in their brains that make them feel better. The endorphin rush they experience with exercise will give them more ability to focus on their homework and be productive instead of staring at a page for hours without making any progress. 

 

Teens often feel a sense of accomplishment from exercising and if they can exercise outdoors, this is another positive way to reinforce good mental health.  

 

Get professional help with assignments

 

 Teens are often faced with overwhelming tasks and they may not know which ones to tackle first. It may relieve their stress to know that they can get professional help with their assignments. British students should try Uk.EduBirdie because it’s a good place to buy an assignment. Students asking, “Are there experts in your topic?” will be happy to know that professional writers with experience in writing on a wide variety of topics are available.

 

Eat healthy

 

If unhealthy fast foods are the main source of fuel for teens, they are likely to crash and experience little energy after an initial high. Their memory, emotional state and learning ability are all affected by what they put into their bodies. They may experience diet-related mood swings, light-headedness and a lack of energy from eating too much of the wrong foods.   

 

Eating regular meals of healthy foods will help them to handle stress and perform at their best. Healthy meals will include a good balance of proteins, fruits and vegetables with not too many carbs or fats. While studying, eating healthy snacks can help them to keep going. 

 

Help Your Teens FreePikTeenStress2-300x202 How School Assignments Affect Your Teen: Preventing Stress and Anxiety Get enough sleep

 

It is easy for teens to let binge-watching Netflix or talking to friends on Whatsapp get in the way of going to sleep at a reasonable hour every night. When they operate in a sleep-deprived state, they are less productive and find it harder to learn.

 

Maintaining a sleep routine is of great importance to mental health and managing stress. Seven to eight hours sleep a night is recommended and going to bed and getting up at the same time in conjunction with relaxing before bedtime can help to improve teens’ sleep quality. 

 

Teens may find it hard to switch off their laptops, phones and tablets at least an hour before they go to bed but blue screens can interfere with their ability to fall asleep. Getting enough sleep can significantly improve their memory, focus, creativity and decision-making, all of which are important inside and outside of school.  

 

Conclusion

 

If teens want to learn how to manage stress, they have to learn how to find a balance between studying and all their other activities. They need to learn how to prioritize and decide what they need to focus on and what they can afford to let go of. Managing their time, exercising, eating healthily and getting enough sleep are all essential if they want to manage their stress effectively.   

 

Author’s Bio:
 
Emma Rundle is a star performer as a writer and has been instrumental in the success of the writing agency she works for. She’s good at writing poems, short stories, academic essays, personal statements and anything students might need her to do in terms of assignments. Her free time is for doing acrylic painting, playing lawn tennis and listening to jazz music.

 

 

 

Tags: ,,

Managing and Reducing School Stress for Teens

Posted by Sue Scheff on August 07, 2021  /   Posted in Featured Article, Parenting Teens, Teen Help

Ways to Help Teenagers Reduce and Manage School Stress

Help Your Teens BigstockFrustratedTEen-300x200 Managing and Reducing School Stress for Teens Middle and high school students are under more stress than ever before. The number of U.S. high school students who experience academic pressure increased by 62 percent over seven years even though performance improved only modestly.

The number of students who spend more than 10 hours per week doing homework rose from 12 percent to 21 percent over three years.

Increasing Concerns About Academic Stress

Some schools are experimenting with turning down the heat on students. A few have taken such measures as eliminating advanced placement classes, reducing the emphasis on textbook learning, and administering fewer tests. However, others worry that such measures are too extreme and will hurt a college-bound student’s chance of competing for spots in the nation’s best colleges.

Many schools and parents are focusing, instead, on giving students the tools for coping with the constant demands of school. This might include more counseling, yoga classes, breathing techniques, or designated homework-free days.

Helping Teenagers Cope with School Stress

All of this increased pressure to perform academically can leave young adults feeling hopeless and parents feeling helpless. However, many experts agree that there are definitive steps parents can take to help their teenagers cope. The American Academy of Pediatrics, for instance, stresses teaching children resilience through such methods building confidence, strengthening family connections, and instilling character.

Here are some specific ways in which parents can help teens become more resilient:

Teaching Organization Skills

Perhaps the only thing more stressful for a student than having to complete homework assignments in several subjects is having to complete the work in an environment full of scattered papers and misplaced supplies. The fact that a child needs special knowledge for advanced mathematics is widely known, but both parents and students often take organization skills for granted.

Just like calculus, the organization is something that has to be learned. Children should be taught as early as elementary school to keep their workspaces and backpacks well-stocked and orderly. However, it is not too late for even the most disorganized teen to learn the basics of organization.

Parents who have not mastered this themselves may face the added challenge of learning along with their teens. Depending on the situation, a teen may need guidance in one or more of the following: removing excess clutter, arranging a desk into a workable space, storing supplies, sorting school papers into folders, or writing organized notes. Some great organization tips can be found in the book Organizing from the Inside Out for Teenagers.

Teaching Time Management Skills

Help Your Teens PexelTimeMgt-300x203 Managing and Reducing School Stress for Teens Time Management skills are a subset of organization skills. However, since time is less tangible than papers in a folder, its management can be a little harder to grasp.

Teen stress due to over-scheduling has often been the subject of discussion in parent circles, but the lack of scheduling can sometimes be a source of even greater pressures. Having multiple assignments, projects, and tests in the works with no study plan can lead to several major stressors, including cramming, late assignments, and poor performance.

Parents can help teens to develop the habit of keeping track of all assignments on a calendar, school planner, chart, or computer. They can also stress the importance of making a checklist of tasks to be completed and demonstrate how to quickly prioritize responsibilities.

Showing teens how to form a schedule for long-term projects or daily study plans for tests can prevent work from piling up and leading to stressful late-night cram sessions. In his book Fighting Invisible Tigers: Stress Management for Teens, psychologist Earl Hipp states that learning to set aside time for relaxation is also an important time management skill.

Teaching Relaxation Techniques

The ability to rest seems like something that should be second nature, but many people in today’s busy world simply do not know how to do it. Teaching teens simple breathing or meditation techniques can go a long way to help relieve tense muscles or calm nerves before an oral presentation. Some numerous books and videos describe such simple techniques. Parents can also advise their teens to enroll in a yoga class.

Offering as Much Support as Possible

Comprehensive way parents can help their middle or high school students to relieve stress is to simply offer their full and unwavering support. Understandably, parents want their children to learn independence, but this can be a gradual process as their children build knowledge and self-confidence.

A parent should continue to provide tutoring and emotional support as well as being actively involved in her child’s education well into the adolescent years. Even something as simple as helping a teenager with a regular household chore during final exams can reduce stress.

About the author: Diane H. Wong is a family coach. Besides, she is a research paper writer DoMyWriting so she prefers to spend her spare time working out marketing strategies. In this case, she has an opportunity to share her experience with others and keep up with advancing technologies.

If you feel you have exhausted your local resources and your teenager is experiencing extreme levels of stress, anxiety or depression – you may want to consider residential therapy. Contact us to learn more about residential treatment.

Tags: ,,

How to Help Your Teen With Sensory Processing Disorder

Posted by Sue Scheff on August 02, 2021  /   Posted in Parenting Teens, Teen Help, Troubled Teens

Helping Your Teen With Sensory Processing Disorder

Help Your Teens PixabayGirlSensory-300x203 How to Help Your Teen With Sensory Processing Disorder Teenagers have it tough today. Between hormonal changes, peer pressure, and all challenges of the pandemic, life can be tough. But it’s even more challenging for teens with sensory processing disorder (SPD).

If your child struggles with SPD, you can help him overcome these challenges. First, let’s learn more about this disorder.

What is Sensory Processing Disorder?

To understand SPD, you must understand how our senses work. When our senses experience input, data is sent to sensory receptors in our nervous system that cause us to react to things like sound or touch. 

Normally, we only react to extreme stimuli such as pain, loud noises, or pungent odors. However, these sensors don’t work properly for people with SPD. For them, mild stimuli can be intense, like lukewarm water feeling scalding hot.

How SPD Impacts Your Teenager 

SPD can be distracting or even dangerous. Noise, touch, or smells that don’t bother most people can feel painful. Your teen may struggle with wearing certain clothes or being exposed to fluorescent light. Large crowds may cause him anxiety.

Teens with SPD can overreact or under-react. For example, they may have a serious injury but not feel any pain. Or, your teen may not be aware of their own strength and hurt others without meaning it.

What’s it like being a teen with SPD? Katie Cicanese describes some of her challenges as a 16-year-old: “…Often little things like sitting in my kitchen can cause me to have extreme panicky feelings. I find sitting anywhere besides my room is difficult because the material and fabric hurt my skin.”

Katie goes on to describe her difficulties in places that most teens commonly frequent: food courts, shopping malls, grocery stores. Even her own home can cause agony.

This can be very stressful for teens. Living with SPD can lead to anxiety, panic disorder, depression, negative emotions, poor attention, poor self-image, and other mental health problems. For some young people, SPD makes them unaware of danger, putting their lives at risk as well.

Many people on the autism spectrum as well as teens with attention deficit disorder experience sensory issues. Today, the causes of this neurological disorder are still unclear. However, you can take steps to help your teenager. 

Helping Your Teen Manage SPD

What can you do to help your child? With a formal diagnosis, therapy may alleviate sensory processing disorder challenges. Numerous options are available depending on what senses are affected:

  • Sensory-based physical therapy 
  • Vision therapy 
  • Listening therapy 
  • Speech or language therapy
  • Psychotherapy 

Therapy can be effective but it may not be covered by insurance. You can also help your teen by implementing some lifestyle changes.

Create a Safe Space at Home

Your teen needs to have a safe home that makes him feel comfortable. You should let him help you choose decor that is sensory-friendly.

Ideas include: 

  • Warm, soft lighting throughout your home. 
  • The paint should be neutral or soothing, gentle colors.
  • Disorganized homes can be very stressful so work on having everything neat and organized.
  • Be aware of things like loud tile or hardwood floors and coarse, rough surfaces on couches and chairs. Comfort and quiet should be key!
  • Window dressings. Make wise choices that block sound and harsh light.

It’s also smart to pay attention to sounds and smells that come into your home. Find ways to make your home calm, soothing, and odor-free.

Tips for Managing Stress

Teach your child good habits for managing stress. Simple strategies can make life less overwhelming for teens with SPD, such as creating a daily routine. This helps reduce anxiety as well. 

Stress can also be alleviated with healthy habits. Teens may prefer junk food but a nutritious diet is better for both physical and mental health. Your child is old enough to plan family meals and participate in their preparation. This encourages both independence and good health.

Fitness, sleep, and relaxation are also necessary to reduce stress. Let your teen pick exercises that challenge him and do them regularly. Make sure he gets at least 8 hours of sleep. And help him to find downtime activities that help him to relax every day. 

Managing School and Planning for the Future

Help Your Teens BigstockFrustratedTEen-300x200 How to Help Your Teen With Sensory Processing Disorder Work with teachers to make your child’s school experience less difficult. If your child has a formal diagnosis, you can get a 504 Plan or IEP to make accommodations. For example, classrooms often have extremely harsh lighting that is uncomfortable for people with SPD. Request teachers to use soft lighting instead or cover the fluorescents.

Other accommodations that can help include:

  • Frequent classroom breaks 
  • Classroom desk arrangement 
  • Cushion or special seat
  • Stress balls to relieve tension
  • Noise-reducing headphones

However, this may not work for your child. High school is your teenager’s introduction to preparing for work. Today, remote learning and work opportunities are far more common. These provide your child an opportunity to excel while remaining in a comfortable atmosphere that does not trigger his SPD. 

For example, he can pursue work-from-home jobs, such as virtual accounting and train from the comfort of his home. Talk with your child’s guidance counselor about options that provide him with a successful remote career path.

Sensory processing disorder can be difficult for teenagers. However, your child can learn to manage it. With your help, your child can survive and even thrive in his teenage years!

 

Tags: ,,

Teen Help: Benefits of Reflexology for Adolescents

Posted by Sue Scheff on July 23, 2021  /   Posted in Teen Help

Teens, Preteens Enjoy Reflexology

Adolescents Benefit from Sessions With Their Reflexologist

Help Your Teens PexelReflexology-300x202 Teen Help: Benefits of Reflexology for Adolescents Teenagers can benefit from reflexology for mood and hormone balancing, general wellness, recovery from a sports injury or simply as a stress coping tool.

Parents are likely to bring their teenaged son or daughter to a reflexologist with a specific wellness goal in mind – be it stress or pain management, mood balancing, or help with focus for school.

Reflexology is thought to be a wonderful modality for young people to get started in natural medicine therapies. The entire body is mirrored on reflex maps found on the hands, feet and ears making this form of therapy ideal for whole-body health and wellness.

Using Reflexology for the Athletic Teen

Sports are increasingly demanding on the teenaged body – often resulting in soft tissue injuries. Reflexology can be a helpful tool in speeding the healing and recovery process after a rough game.

Students that are trying to juggle a full class load as well as extra curricular activities such as dance, basketball, soccer, wrestling and the like may find their calendar overwhelming. Self-help reflexology tips from the practitioner can help the adolescent cope with these feelings and manage stress in tense moments.

Balancing Hormones with Reflexology

Nobody ever said it would be easy going through puberty and today’s teens are bombarded with hormone disrupters since conception. Advanced reflexology techniques from a qualified reflexologist can be used on the endocrine system reflexes to restore a level of balance to the body’s hormone levels.

Preteens facing their first menstrual cycle and with classic signs of premenstrual syndrome (PMS) can find comfort in a nurturing reflexology session. Techniques can emphasize reproductive system reflexes and pelvic area reflexes to ease cramping and discomfort.

Reflexology as a Coping Tool for Teen Stress

Help Your Teens BigSTockFamilyEatingPizza-300x198 Teen Help: Benefits of Reflexology for Adolescents Pressures from school, friends and the community can be a daily source of stress for teens. Changes in family relationships can be difficult to cope with as well. While mom can enjoy a relaxing bath and dad can knock down a couple of beers after a hectic day, how do teenagers relax?

Families can set wellness goals and health plans to incorporate regular coping tools to combat the day to day stressors of life. These might include regular exercise, healthy meal plans, and family time together – like game night or pizza dinner.

Reflexology can fit nicely into a wellness plan for the teen. Frequency will be based on factors such as stress levels and health goals. The reflexologist may suggest initial appointments be kept weekly or every other week with the goal of tapering off to monthly or seasonally.

Self-Help Reflexology for Family Bonding

Many mothers report great satisfaction in their relationship with their preteen or teen when reflexology is taken home. Exchanging foot rubs can be a nightly or weekly event between a parent and the preteen or teen child. Don’t mistake this for a girls’ only activity though – many boys enjoy giving and receiving therapeutic touch at home too.

Ask the reflexologist for suggestions on techniques or specific reflex points that would be beneficial to work between appointments. Or consider enrolling in an introductory workshop on reflexology to learn the basics from a reflexologist. Adding reflexology into a wellness plan for the whole family can be a great way to encourage communication and gird up relationships.

Leaving Reflexology up to the Teen

It is not recommended to force the teenager to attend a reflexology session. The first appointment may elicit feelings of awkwardness or embarrassment – as with most new ideas from parents. Leaving the frequency up to the teen will give him a sense of control over his wellness so he can request a session without having to explain the need for one.

If the teen is particularly reluctant to trying something new, the reflexologist may offer an introductory meeting to answer any questions and explain what to expect from a reflexology session. Most adolescents find reflexology thoroughly enjoyable – it is relaxing, safe, and can be controlled by requesting changes in pressure techniques.

About the author: Bianca J. Ward is a professional marketing manager at essaywriterfree. Besides, she is a passionate photographer and traveler who has visited 52 countries all over the world. Bianca dreams about creating a photo exhibition to present her works to others.

Tags: ,,,

Preventing Teen School Stress

Posted by Sue Scheff on May 13, 2021  /   Posted in Teen Help

Guide On How Teens Can Rest Easy And Prevent School Stress

Help Your Teens PexelStudyTeen-300x205 Preventing Teen School Stress Teenagers often face a lot of challenges at this part of their lives, especially with school. They’re growing, studying, learning, and so on. 

But with that said, the daily pressures of school can cause stress, which can affect how your teen is sleeping at night. While the lack of sleep is normal for teenagers, it doesn’t have to be this way.

This quick guide will explore why sleep is important for teens, and how they can get a good night’s sleep despite the stresses that can come from school.

Why So Sleepy?

“Believe it or not, a teenager’s life can be very hectic, even in school,” says Zachary Hincks, a health writer at Boom Essays and Essay Roo. “The problem is, there’s an obvious need for ‘downtime,’ so that teens can rejuvenate and be more alert and relaxed during their school days. The Centers for Disease Control and Protection, or the CDC, suggests that teens should sleep between 8 and 10 hours per 24 hours. However, late nights are tempting for teens, whether they’re hitting the books, cramming for a test the next day, or out with friends.”

Why Does Sleep Matter?

Help Your Teens PexelSleepingTeen-300x200 Preventing Teen School Stress Sleep is crucial for teens, because the lack of it can lead to the following:

With sleep, teens will be able to gain more energy for the next day, even when they’ve had a rough day at school the day before. 

Tips For Teens To Sleep Well

So, now that you know how important it is for your teen(s) to get a good night’s sleep, here are some helpful tips on how you can ensure that they’re resting well. With these tips, you can help them prevent the stresses of school from eating away at them:

    • Having a bedtime routine should consist of the following: 
      • Having a consistent bedtime (say, 8:00 PM every night)
      • A light snack before bed
      • Keeping the room dark, cool, and quiet at night
      • Turning the lights on (or open the curtains) right after they get up in the morning
    • The bed should be for sleeping only. That means teens should do their homework, be on mobile devices, etc. off and away from the bed. 
    • Limit your teen’s naps to 30 minutes or less.
    • Make sure your teen is exercising every day.
    • Limit your teen’s caffeine (i.e., coffee, soda, tea, energy drinks) intake. 
    • Don’t heavily rely on over-the-counter sleep aids to help your teen sleep. 
    • Don’t ever let your teen aid their sleep with drugs or alcohol.
    • Limit your teen’s screen time before bedtime.
    • Have your teen keep a sleep diary to keep track of:
      • What time(s) they’ve been going to bed
      • What’s causing them to have difficulty sleeping
      • Any upcoming tests and or events that they might be worrying about, etc.

What Teens Can Do If They Can’t Fall Asleep

“Sometimes, despite taking the necessary steps in getting ready for bed, teens may still find it hard to simply fall asleep,” says Jamie Sambell, a psychology blogger at Paper Fellows and State of writing. “The best thing for them to do is to get up and distract themselves with reading or drawing until they get tired. This allows your body to prep for sleep naturally.”

When Teens Should See A Doctor

Seeing a doctor can be a last resort, if your teen(s) are still having trouble sleeping at night. You may want to take note of your teen’s sleep habits as you take them to the doctor.

With that said, contact your teen’s doctor, if they’re experiencing the following: 

    • Waking up during the night, and can’t go back to sleep
    • Waking too early in the morning
    • Lack of energy despite getting enough sleep
    • Not doing homework
    • Not attending school
    • Having excessive feelings of sadness, depression, and or anxiety
    • Lack of focus
    • Other illnesses or ailments (i.e., loss of appetite, headaches, etc.)

Conclusion

As you can see, sleep is essential for teen(s). While school is extremely important, so is a good night’s sleep.

We hope that this guide was helpful in understanding why sleep is important to your teen(s), and how you can ensure that they’re sleeping well at night. With this guide in mind, you can help them prevent the stresses of school from eating away at them.

Contributor: Elizabeth Hines is a writer and editor at Assignment helpand Academized. She is also a contributing writer for Essay for sale. As a digital marketer, she helps companies improve their marketing strategies and concepts. As a content writer, she writes articles about the latest tech and marketing trends, innovations, and strategies. 

 

Tags: ,

Parenting The New Teen In The Age Of Anxiety

Posted by Sue Scheff on December 31, 2020  /   Posted in Featured Book, Teen Help

Parenting the New Teen in the Age of Anxiety: A Complete Guide to Your Child’s Stressed, Depressed, Expanded, Amazing Adolescence

Help Your Teens bigstock-Teenage-Girl-Victim-Of-Bullyin-120053000-300x200 Parenting The New Teen In The Age Of Anxiety

By Dr. John Duffy

Parenting is more difficult and complicated than it has ever been. Our kids today are psychologically and emotionally burdened by social media, unreasonable academic and social stressors, and an unprecedented stream of information.

They are exposed to the harshest elements of the world much too soon. The upside is that they have this thoughtful, compassionate worldview and sense of justice that we may have lacked. The downside is that our kids are in an undue degree of psychic pain. They suffer far more anxiety, depression, attention issues, and suicidal ideation than any generation preceding them.

More than ever, our kids need us to help them make sense of, and integrate, all they take in, starting at a very early age. To do that, we must know and truly understand their world.

This book is a complete guide to all of the issues that your child, teen and young adult will face.

So when your kid is overwhelmed (and your kid is going to feel overwhelmed), when you kid is exposed to too much (and your kid will be exposed to too much), she will know: I have mom and/or dad, and they are my constant, they are my solid. I can go to them and they are going to hear me out, without judgment. I know that. I know that I can talk to them and they are going to be there for me unequivocally. In their complicated world, with all of this stimuli, with all of this identity traffic, kids need some compass. They need you to be that compass.

Help Your Teens BookParentingAnxiety Parenting The New Teen In The Age Of Anxiety Inside Parenting Inside the New Teen In the Age of Anxiety:

Learn about the “New Teen” and how to adjust your parenting approach. Kids are growing up with nearly unlimited access to social media and the internet, and unprecedented academic, social, and familial stressors. Starting as early as eight years old, children are exposed to information, thought, and emotion that they are developmentally unprepared to process. As a result, saving the typical “teen parenting” strategies for thirteen-year-olds is now years too late.

Urgent advice for parents of teens. Dr. John Duffy’s parenting book is a new and necessary guide that addresses this hidden phenomenon of the changing teenage brain. Dr. Duffy, a nationally recognized expert in parenting for nearly twenty-five years, offers this book as a guide for parents raising children who are growing up quickly and dealing with unresolved adolescent issues that can lead to anxiety and depression.

Unprecedented psychological suffering among our young and why it is occurring. A shift has taken place in how and when children develop. Because of the exposure they face, kids are emotionally overwhelmed at a young age, often continuing to search for a sense of self well into their twenties. Paradoxically, Dr. Duffy recognizes the good that comes with these challenges, such as the sense of justice instilled in teenagers starting at a young age.

Readers of this book will:

  • Sort through the overwhelming circumstances of today’s teens and better understand the changing landscape of adolescence
  • Come away with a revised, conscious parenting plan more suited to addressing the current needs of the New Teen
  • Discover the joy in parenting again by reclaiming the role of your teen’s ally, guide, and consultant

Order today on Amazon.

Tags: ,,,,

As Featured On

Help Your Teens DrPhil_Season_7_title_card1-250x139 Home Bottom - Logos Help Your Teens oprah-logo-250x1091 Home Bottom - Logos Help Your Teens PLATFORMforgood Home Bottom - Logos Help Your Teens ParentingTodaysKids Home Bottom - Logos Help Your Teens sunsentinel Home Bottom - Logos Help Your Teens Galtime Home Bottom - Logos Help Your Teens FoxNews1 Home Bottom - Logos Help Your Teens Forbes-Magazine-Logo-Font Home Bottom - Logos Help Your Teens huffington-post-logo Home Bottom - Logos
Help Your Teens family-online-safety-300x112 Home Bottom - Logos Help Your Teens TodayMoms Home Bottom - Logos Help Your Teens usatoday Home Bottom - Logos Help Your Teens washpost Home Bottom - Logos Help Your Teens abcnews Home Bottom - Logos Help Your Teens CNN-living1 Home Bottom - Logos Help Your Teens anderson-cooper-360-logo-250x107 Home Bottom - Logos Help Your Teens cbs_eve_logo Home Bottom - Logos Help Your Teens bostonglobe-250x250 Home Bottom - Logos Help Your Teens nbc6 Home Bottom - Logos Help Your Teens newsweek Home Bottom - Logos

..and many more.

  • Follow @SueScheff

  • RSS Sue Scheff Blog

    • Teen Online Safety Tips October 15, 2021
      As a parent, you want to protect your child from the dangers of the internet. There are countless stories of predators, hackers, and thieves targeting and exploiting young adults. To avoid this, many parents will go as far as to limit or prohibit their child’s use of the internet. However, this solution isn’t practical. The […]
    • Could Instagram Be Damaging Our Teens? September 29, 2021
      Facebook Knew Instagram Could Be Harmful to Our Teens The tech giant has studied how the app affects youth. An article in The Wall Street Journal reports that Facebook’s own documents found Instagram to be damaging to teens. A 2017 survey, published by the U.K.’s Royal Society for Public Health, found Instagram to be “worst […]
    • Helping Your Teen Identify Misinformation Online August 24, 2021
      Teens today have grown up surrounded by technology. Some might argue they were practically born with smartphones in their hands. In some cases, your teenager might even know more about the Internet than you. But that doesn’t mean they aren’t susceptible to getting into trouble online. Because teens feel so comfortable using computers and phones, […]

To get help, CLICK HERE or call us at 954-260-0805
P.U.R.E. does not provide legal advice and does not have an attorney on staff.
^ Back to Top
Copyright © 2001-2021 Help Your Teens. Optimized Web Design by SEO Web Mechanics Site Map