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Teen Violence

Why Is My Teen Quick to Anger and Rage

Posted by Sue Scheff on September 07, 2021  /   Posted in Teen Help

Can Anger and Rage Lead to Teen Violence?

Help Your Teens angry-teen-girl-300x156 Why Is My Teen Quick to Anger and Rage We hear it often.  Your teen can be very angry or full of rage, many times it is targeted at the parent.  Keep in mind they are not stupid.

They know parents love them unconditionally.  No matter how anger they get, you will always love them.  They are venting their rage towards you but many times it is not personal.

The American Psychological Association says that anger is a normal, usually healthy, human emotion. But when it gets out of control and turns destructive, it can lead to violent outcomes.

Many teens today have a difficult time keeping their anger under control, as evidenced by the following data:

  • According to SafeYouth.com more than 1 in 3 high school students, both male and female, have been involved in a physical fight. 1 in 9 of those students have been injured badly enough to need medical treatment.
  • The 2002 National Gang Trends Survey (NGTS) stated that there are more than 24,500 different street gangs in the United States alone. More than 772,500 of the members of these gangs are teens and young adults.
  • The 2002 NGTS also showed that teens and young adults involved in gang activity are 60 times more likely to be killed than the rest of the American population.
  • A 2001 report released by the U.S. Department of Justice claims that 20 out of 1000 women ages 16 to 24 will experience a sexual assault while on a date. And that 68% of all rape victims know their attackers.
  • The U.S. Justice report also stated that 1 in 3 teens, both male and female, have experienced some sort of violent behavior from a dating partner.

Help Your Teens screaming-teen-boy-300x201 Why Is My Teen Quick to Anger and Rage Anger creates physical changes that both teens and parents need to recognize:  increased heart rate, a rise in blood pressure, soaring adrenaline levels.

Once these changes occur, along with the thoughts that fuel the anger, the emotion can be hurtful.  Provena Mercy Center cites the following warning signs indicating that your teen’s anger is unhealthy:

  • A frequent loss of temper at the slightest provocation
  • Brooding isolation from family and friends
  • Damage to one’s body or property
  • A need to exact revenge on others
  • Decreased involvement in social activities

If you believe your teen has a problem with anger, you can help him or her develop positive conflict resolution techniques. The University of Michigan Health System (UMHS) explains that teaching children strategies for dealing with their anger can be difficult, because you don’t know when your child will get angry again.  To help, use the time between angry outbursts to discuss your child’s anger, and practice how to deal with it.  The UMHS outlines the following strategies for teaching your child anger management:

  • Practice a substitute behavior. You and your child should develop a substitute behavior to use when he or she is about to get angry.  Some ideas include breathing methods, counting backward or visualizing a peaceful scene or a stop sign.
  • Reward. Sit down with your child and figure out some rewards that he or she can earn by practicing the exercises (on a daily basis), and when he or she uses the exercises when frustrated or angry.  Don’t skip the rewards – they are essential to the success of anger management in children.
  • Give examples. Think of times when you deal effectively with your own stress and point these out, very briefly, to your child.  Also, share your coping strategies with your child as examples of how he/she might handle a similar situation.  It is important for your child to see you successfully deal with your own anger.
  • Encourage using the exercises. When your child starts to get upset, briefly encourage him or her to practice the substitute behavior. Only prompt your child once.  Do not continue to nag him/her about using the exercises.
  • Avoid arguments but do discipline consistently.  Avoid arguing with your child.  Everybody loses when a confrontation occurs. You need to set a good example and deal with your child in a quiet, matter-of-fact manner.  

Help Your Teens TeenWriting-300x227 Why Is My Teen Quick to Anger and Rage The Nemours Foundation reports that teens often require specific coping strategies that are less formal than behavior modification.  Have your teen try the following tips next time he/she begins to lose his/her temper:

  • Listen to music with your headphones on and put your “anger energy” into dancing.
  • Write it down in any form – poetry or journal entries, for example.
  • Draw it – scribble, doodle or sketch your angry feelings using strong colors and lines.
  • Run, play a sport or work out. You’ll be amazed at how physical activity helps work out the anger.
  • Meditate or practice deep breathing. This one works best if you do it regularly, not when you’re actually having a meltdown.  Meditation is a stress management technique that can help you gain self-control and not blow a fuse when you’re mad.
  • Talk about your feelings with someone you trust.  Many times, other feelings – such as fear or sadness — lie beneath the anger.  Talking about these feelings can help.
  • Distract yourself so you can get your mind past what’s bugging you.  Watch television, read or go to the movies instead of stewing for hours about something.

Parents who teach anger-management strategies and encourage non-aggressive conflict-resolution techniques early on may find the teenage years less challenging.  If your child has long-lasting feelings of anger or is unable to adopt coping strategies, seek medical assistance and treatment.

References

  • American Psychological Association
  • National Center for Education Statistics
  • Nemours Foundation
  • Provena Mercy Center
  • University of Michigan Health System
  • U.S. Department of Education

If your teen is struggling with anger and rage to a point that it is destroying your family, don’t hesitate to reach out for local help.  If they refuse to get help or you find it isn’t benefiting them, contact us to determine if residential therapy would be an option.   Exhausting your local resources is always your first path.

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Teens, Violence and Guns: What’s a Parent’s Responsibility?

Posted by Sue Scheff on September 04, 2015  /   Posted in Teen Help

Teens and Guns

Help Your Teens Gun-300x185 Teens, Violence and Guns: What's a Parent's Responsibility? A 2014 survey by the Pew Research Center found that 34 percent of American households with children under the age of 12 have firearms. It behooves gun enthusiasts to not only teach their children how to properly use firearms, but also be up to date on all the latest laws and treatises being discussed and passed by U.S. and state governments.

The following three tips will make you a more responsible gun owner and parent:

Second Amendment Discussion

There are many different reasons Americans choose to own firearms. Avid hunters typically like to own several shotguns and muzzleloaders. Former military men and women often carry over the hobby of taking apart and building firearms from scratch. But when explaining guns and self-defense to children, it’s usually best to stick to the laws and treatises of the land.

The Second Amendment of the U.S. Constitution reads: “A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.” The aforementioned sentence has been dissected and re-interpreted perpetually since the Amendment was ratified in 1791. The law was passed after the Revolutionary War to guarantee Americans the right to defend themselves against tyrannical government entities.

The U.S. Supreme Court, in the case of District of Columbia v. Heller, clarified the meaning of the Second Amendment once and for all in 2008. The court struck down a 32-year ban on handgun possession within the Washington D.C. city limits. The majority ruled that the ban violated Americans’ individual rights to bear arms. There are only five states left in the Union that prohibit open-carry all together after Texas legalized it for licensed gun owners this year.

Firearm Storage

Always keep your firearms locked away and out of the reach of children. There are plenty of options for gun safes that fit every budget. Emphasize to your children that they should never touch a firearm without your supervision. If you feel a gun is necessary in a nightstand or dresser drawer for protection, make sure it’s not loaded. Keep the safety engaged on all firearms while not in use.

Teaching Recreational Shooting

There is no right or wrong answer as to when you should start teaching your kids how to shoot. The National Shooting Sports Foundation highlighted the story of former Olympian Vincent Hancock who shot his first clay target at age five. He went on to win consecutive gold medals in skeet shooting at the 2008 Beijing Olympics and the 2012 London Olympics.

Regardless of when you choose to introduce your children to shooting, there are some universal safety rules all parents need to follow:

  • Always keep the muzzle pointed downward when not intending to immediately shoot.
  • Keep your finger off the trigger until you’re ready to shoot.
  • Eye and ear protection are necessary to prevent hearing damage.

Firearms are as American as apple pie, so make sure you’re exercising your right to bear arms in a safe and responsible manner.

Help Your Teens PixabayRose-300x201 Teens, Violence and Guns: What's a Parent's Responsibility? ******

Keeping guns safe is a priority.  Is there a reason outside of recreational shooting that your teen is wanting a gun?  Mental health has become a major topic in our county when it comes to shootings.

If your teen is struggling emotionally, having feelings of suicidal or homicidal thoughts, get help immediately.  If they refuse local help or you feel it isn’t helping, please contact us for more information.

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