fbpx
^ Back to Top
954-260-0805

Teens Mental Health During COVID

Teens Dealing with the Emotional Toll of COVID

How is your teen copin​g during COVID-19?

Check in with your teen often to discuss how they’re feeling and managing, and watch for signs of mental health struggles. Keep in mind that these signs are not the same for everyone; different people show different signs when trying to deal with mental health challenges.​

It’s normal for teens to feel sad during this time, crying sometimes because they miss their friends or because sports and musical productions were cancelled. However, your teen likely could benefit from extra support if they have:

  • changes in mood that are not usual for your child, such as ongoing irritability, feelings of hopelessness or rage, and frequent conflicts with friends and family.
  • changes in behavior, such as stepping back from personal relationships. If your ordinarily outgoing teen shows little interest in texting or video chatting with their friends while stuck at home, for example, this might be cause for concern.
  • a lack of interest in activities previously enjoyed. Did your music-loving child suddenly stop wanting to practice guitar, for example? Did your aspiring chef lose all interest in cooking and baking?
  • a hard time falling or staying asleep, or starting to sleep all the time.
  • changes in weight or eating patterns, such as never being hungry or eating all the time.
  • problems with memory, thinking, or concentration.
  • changes in appearance, such as lack of basic personal hygiene (within reason, since many are doing slightly less grooming during this time at home.)
  • an increase in risky or reckless behaviors, such as using drugs or alcohol.
  • ​thoughts about death or suicide, or talking about it (see “A word about suicide risk in teens” ).

Remem​ber

Parents set the tone in the household. Expressing extreme doom or fear can affect teens. Try to stay positive and relay consistent messages that a brighter future lies ahead. Keep lines of communication open between you and your teen, and don’t hesitate to talk with your pediatrician about ways to help maintain your family’s mental health during this difficult time.

More informa​tion

Source: American Academy of Pediatrics (Copyright © 2020)

As Featured On

DrPhil_Season_7_title_card1-250x139oprah-logo-250x1091PLATFORMforgoodParentingTodaysKidssunsentinelGaltimeFoxNews1Forbes-Magazine-Logo-Fonthuffington-post-logo
family online safetyTodayMomsusatodaywashpostabcnewsCNN-living1anderson-cooper-360-logo-250x107cbs_eve_logobostonglobe-250x250nbc6newsweek

..and many more.

  • Facebook

  • Follow @SueScheff

  • RSS Sue Scheff Blog

    • Teens, Social Media and College Admission February 5, 2021
      We’re all a click away from digital disgrace Reality is, we’re a tweet or post away from losing an interview, a job or for many young people — a spot for their first choice college. The percentage of college admissions officers who believe that incorporating applicants’ social media pages into their decisions is “fair game” […]
    • Worries and Concerns of Teen Online Dating January 7, 2021
      Are you a parent of a teen that is using a dating app? In most cases, online dating is unsafe for teens. This is because, as you probably already know, there are a lot of predators online who try to prey on teens. That cute 16-year-old lacrosse player who lives a few hours away that […]
    • When Should Parents Snoop Rather Than Monitor Teen Online Behavior? December 14, 2020
      When Safety Trumps Privacy This has been a debate for years and the answer comes back to when safety trumps privacy. Especially now as technology is in the hands of every teens and many tweens, as well as COVID has locked us online more than ever — parents need to be in tune with how […]

To get help, CLICK HERE or call us at 954-260-0805
P.U.R.E. does not provide legal advice and does not have an attorney on staff.
^ Back to Top
Copyright © 2001-2021 Help Your Teens. Optimized Web Design by SEO Web Mechanics Site Map