fbpx
^ Back to Top
954-260-0805

Teens Using Drugs To Selling Drugs

Posted by Sue Scheff on July 05, 2015  /   Posted in Parenting Teens, Troubled Teens

Teens Using Drugs To Selling Drugs

Help Your Teens TeenBuyingDrugs Teens Using Drugs To Selling Drugs Many parents will say…. “Not my teen.

However sadly even with the best of kids today, it happens.

Parents fear their teens using drugs –  some parents even make excuses – “it’s just pot, I did it when I was a teen,” please understand – this is not the marijuana you did when you were a teen – in most cases marijuana can be laced with other substances (such as heroin) that can be addictive or even deadly.

When a teen gets desperate, it can call for desperate measures and that could potentially mean selling drugs.

Teens will turn to dealing for one of two reasons.  To either support their habit or to make money.  Either way, it benefits their drug use.

Parents should wake up and realize they have to intervene before this escalates to major drug trafficking and your child is not just arrested for possession but now is dealing with drug trafficking, selling to minors – and maybe more serious charges.  Especially if your teen is nearing 18 years old, he/she could be charged as an adult.

Don’t be in denial.  Don’t blame the other kids.  This is your teen making the choices – and of course, the drugs causing negative behavior.

Help Your Teens ParentTeenAnger_2 Teens Using Drugs To Selling Drugs Ten tips help prevent substance abuse:

 1. Communication is the key to prevention. Whenever an opportunity to talk about the risks of drinking and driving or the dangers of using drugs presents itself, take it and start a conversation.

2. Have a conversation not a confrontation. If you suspect your teen is using drugs, talk to her. Don’t judge her; instead, talk to her about facts behind the dangers of substance abuse. If your teen isn’t opening up to you, be sure you find an adolescent therapist who can help.

3. Addict in the family. Do you have an addict in your family? Sadly many families have been affected by someone who has allowed drugs to take over his or her life. With this, it is a reminder to your teen that you want him to have a bright future filled with happiness. The last thing you want for them is to end up like [name of addicted relative].

4. Don’t be a parent in denial. There is no teenager who is immune to drug abuse. No matter how smart your teen is, or athletic she is, she’s at risk if she starts using. I firmly believe that keeping your teen constructively busy, whether through sports, music or other hobbies, will put her at less risk to want to experiment. However don’t be in the dark thinking that because your teen is pulling a 4.0 GPA and is on the varsity football team that he couldn’t be dragged down by peer pressure. Go back to my number one tip—talk, talk, talk. Remind your teen how proud you are of him, and let him know that you’re always available if he’s being pressured to do or try something he don’t want to.

5. Do you even know what your teen is saying? Listen, or watch on text messages or emails, for code words for medication being abused or specific drug activity: skittling; tussing; skittles; robo-tripping; red devils; velvet; triple C; C-C-C-; and robotard are just some of the names kids use for cough and cold medication abuse. Weed; pot; ganja; mary jane; grass; chronic; buds; blunt; hootch; jive stick; ace; spliff; skunk; smoke; dubie; flower; and zig zag are all slang for marijuana.

Help Your Teens OTCmeds-300x243 Teens Using Drugs To Selling Drugs 6. Leftovers. Are there empty medicine bottles or wrappers in your teen’s room or car (if they own one)? Does she have burn marks on her clothes or her bedroom rug, and ashes or a general stench in her room or car? Be sure to check all pockets, garbage cans, cars, closets, and under beds, etc., for empty wrappers and other evidence of drug use. Where do you keep your prescription drugs?  Have you counted them lately? Teens and tweens often ingest several pills at once or smash them so that all of the drug’s affect is released at once.

7. Body language. Tune into changes in your teen’s behavior. Are his peer groups changing? Is he altering his physical appearance or suddenly lack hygiene? Are his eating and/or sleeping patterns changing? Does he display a hostile, uncooperative, or defiant attitude, and is he sneaking out of the house? Are you missing money or other valuables from your home?

8. Access to alcohol. Look around your home—are alcoholic beverages (liquor, beer, or wine) easily accessible? Teens typically admit that getting alcohol is easy, and that the easiest place to get it is in their own homes. Be aware of what you have in the house and if you suspect your teen is drinking, lock it up! Talk to them about the risks of drinking, especially if they are driving.

9. Seal the deal. Have your teen sign a contract stating that she promises never to drink and drive. The organization Students Against Destructive Decisions (formerly known as Students Against Drunk Driving), www.saddonline.com provides a free online contract you can download. It may help her pause just the second she needs, to not get behind that wheel.

10. Set the example, be the example. What many parents don’t realize is that they are the leading role model for their teen. If your teen sees you smoking or drinking frequently, what is the message you are sending? At the same time, many adults enjoy a glass of wine or other alcoholic beverage, and the teen needs to understand that they are adults and there’s a reason the legal drinking age is 21.

A very important piece of advice I share on a daily basis, which I learned the hard way, is that you have to be a parent first, even if it means your teen hates you. The hate is temporary. Your teen’s future, health, and safety depend on your parenting. Friendship will come later—and it does!

If your teen is struggling with substance abuse issue, it is imperative you get them help.  If you have exhausted local resources or they refuse to attend, please consider residential therapy.  Contact us for more information.

Tags: ,

As Featured On

Help Your Teens DrPhil_Season_7_title_card1-250x139 Home Bottom - Logos Help Your Teens oprah-logo-250x1091 Home Bottom - Logos Help Your Teens PLATFORMforgood Home Bottom - Logos Help Your Teens ParentingTodaysKids Home Bottom - Logos Help Your Teens sunsentinel Home Bottom - Logos Help Your Teens Galtime Home Bottom - Logos Help Your Teens FoxNews1 Home Bottom - Logos Help Your Teens Forbes-Magazine-Logo-Font Home Bottom - Logos Help Your Teens huffington-post-logo Home Bottom - Logos
Help Your Teens family-online-safety-300x112 Home Bottom - Logos Help Your Teens TodayMoms Home Bottom - Logos Help Your Teens usatoday Home Bottom - Logos Help Your Teens washpost Home Bottom - Logos Help Your Teens abcnews Home Bottom - Logos Help Your Teens CNN-living1 Home Bottom - Logos Help Your Teens anderson-cooper-360-logo-250x107 Home Bottom - Logos Help Your Teens cbs_eve_logo Home Bottom - Logos Help Your Teens bostonglobe-250x250 Home Bottom - Logos Help Your Teens nbc6 Home Bottom - Logos Help Your Teens newsweek Home Bottom - Logos

..and many more.

  • Follow @SueScheff

  • RSS Sue Scheff Blog

    • Teen Gaming Addiction June 21, 2021
      Signs of Teen Gaming Addiction Many parents are concerned with the amount of time their tweens and teens spend online. Whether it’s communicating with friends through social media, texting or chatting — or they are playing video games, it all involves screen-time. What is gaming internet addiction? Experts say that just because someone uses the […]
    • Social Media: The Emotional Impact on Teens May 13, 2021
      Preventing the Adverse Effects of Social Media on Teens Social media was created to make people socialize virtually, and that has been possible to some extent. There are multiple other benefits of social media as well, but the question is do the pros outweigh the cons of social media. If you aren’t wise enough, things […]
    • Digital Citizenship: The Most Important Thing for a Screen-Using Youth To Learn April 13, 2021
      Young people spend much of their lives in front of a screen, and with the pandemic, that time has increased substantially. Yet, few young people are taught how to be good citizens online, let alone how to balance the time they spend online with all the other parts of life—like sleeping, mealtimes, exercise, and face-to-face […]

To get help, CLICK HERE or call us at 954-260-0805
P.U.R.E. does not provide legal advice and does not have an attorney on staff.
^ Back to Top
Copyright © 2001-2021 Help Your Teens. Optimized Web Design by SEO Web Mechanics Site Map